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David Wayne HAMP and Barbara SUMNER




Husband David Wayne HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Harold D. HAMP
         Mother: Carol Ann LALONDE


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Wife Barbara SUMNER (details suppressed for this person)

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1 M Daniel HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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2 F Ashley HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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Paul Louis ORTIZ and Diane Lynne HAMP




Husband Paul Louis ORTIZ (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Diane Lynne HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Harold D. HAMP
         Mother: Carol Ann LALONDE



   Other Spouse: Danny Keith KIRKEY



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1 M Paul Daniel ORTIZ (details suppressed for this person)

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2 M Craig Scott ORTIZ (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Laurie Jane SMITH (living)



3 M Thomas Edmund ORTIZ (details suppressed for this person)

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4 M Marc Louis ORTIZ (details suppressed for this person)

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Danny Keith KIRKEY and Diane Lynne HAMP




Husband Danny Keith KIRKEY (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Diane Lynne HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Harold D. HAMP
         Mother: Carol Ann LALONDE



   Other Spouse: Paul Louis ORTIZ



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Harold D. HAMP and Carol Ann LALONDE




Husband Harold D. HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Carol Ann LALONDE (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Francis Leo LALONDE (1909-1980)
         Mother: Mildred Pearl OCHA (1914-1942)





Children
1 F Diane Lynne HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Paul Louis ORTIZ (living)
         Spouse: Danny Keith KIRKEY (living)



2 M Ronald Francis HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Patricia Louise WAZNY (living)



3 F Linda Kay HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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4 M David Wayne HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Barbara SUMNER (living)



5 F Brenda Ann HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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         Spouse: Christopher LOWELL (living)
         Spouse: Douglas Mark GARCIA (living)
         Spouse: Francis Joseph BAILEY (living)





Linda Kay HAMP




Husband (details suppressed for this person)

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Wife Linda Kay HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Harold D. HAMP
         Mother: Carol Ann LALONDE





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1 M Micheal Mario HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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2 M Jeremy J. FROHRIEP (details suppressed for this person)

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3 M David Lee HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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Ronald Francis HAMP and Patricia Louise WAZNY




Husband Ronald Francis HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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         Father: Harold D. HAMP
         Mother: Carol Ann LALONDE


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Wife Patricia Louise WAZNY (details suppressed for this person)

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1 M Jason Clayton HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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2 M Nathan Patrick HAMP (details suppressed for this person)

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Albert Henry OCHA and Honora HANLEY




Husband Albert Henry OCHA




           Born: 5 Apr 1863 - Port Hope, Huron Co., Michigan
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           Died: 22 Nov 1912 - Eagle Harbor, Keweenaw Co., Michigan
         Buried:  - Eagle Harbor, Keweenaw Co., Michigan


         Father: Antoine OCHA (1812-1896)
         Mother: (H)Esther Eleanor Homer HEAL (      -1904)


       Marriage: Abt 1887-1888 - Marquette, Marquette Co., Michigan

   Other Spouse: Georgina (Georgiana) FONTAINE (1862-1910) - 13 Aug 1896 - Elyria, Lorain, Ohio

Noted events in his life were:


Military Service, US Life Saving Service Dates with Stations, 1882-1912 - Michigan and Ohio

Albert served at the following stations:
Ottawa or Tawas Point, Iosco Co., Michigan - Surfman - 1882
Portage Canal, Houghton Co., Michigan - Keeper - 1886 to 1891
Grand Point au Sable, Mason Co., Michigan - Surfman - 1892 to 1893
Ashtabula, Ohio - Surfman - 1894 - 1895 - under Keeper Fayette E. Walworth
Crisp Point, Chippewa Co., Michigan - Surfman - 1896 to 1899
Two Heart, Luce Co., Michigan - Keeper - 1900 to 1912
Eagle Harbor, Keweenaw Co., Michigan - Keeper - September 26, 1912
Gleaned from service records of US Life Saving Service Personel

Newspaper Article, titled Double Recue, 18 Nov 1886 - Chocolay, Marquette Co., Michigan

Nebraska * Lincoln * The Evening News * 1894-05-21 page 7
Ohio * Sandusky * The Sandusky Register * 1894-05-28 page 5

A DOUBLE RESCUE

THRILLING SCENES DURING A BLIZZARD ON THE GREAT LAKES.

Old Superior Was Changed Into an Angry Ocean and the Lives of Wrecked Mariners Hung by a Single Thread - True Tales From the Life Savers' Logbooks.

Copyright 1894 by American Press Association. Book rights reserved.

It was not alone the picturesque wilderness of tempest and flood that drew to the shore of the lake in the harbor of Marquette, Mich., a throng of people on the morning of Nov. 18, 1886, but the fascination which threatened calamity exerts upon the human mind. Prevention and rescue might be impossible, but a burning desire to see and know the worst caused hundreds of townsfolk to quit their warm firesides and face the snow laden, biting air of north-easterly blizzard, which, in the nature of things, must strew the coasts with the broken hulls of wrecked vessels and the bodies of human victims.

For a day the gale had raged over the bosom of the lake and lashed it into a roaring sea. Throughout the wild night the thrilling tale had sped from house to house and flown from lip to lip that the waves had broken over the bounds fixed by the hand of man; that the bulkhead sheltering the docks was simply a lone rock in the Niagara of waters dividing the flood and arousing it to fiercer anger, its danger light tower swept away, its planking wrenched loose from the spiles and a resistless current foaming over it with each swell of the tide, dismantling and submerging the warehouse docks and platforms along shore. Reports of vessels driven headlong before the blast and snatched from destruction by the narrowest chance added to the general nervousness and alarm. One distressing tragedy enacted before a crowd of sightseers on the shore powerless to render aid lent an aspect of realism to the weird and awful scene. A man, in trying to escape from a schooner which was about to crash upon the docks, jumped from the rigging toward the deck of a tug which was pounding up and down alongside and fell between the grinding hulls, where he was instantly crushed to a shapeless mass. Undismayed, seven of his shipmates took the hazardous leap for life and were saved. The same tug had snatched another unmanageable schooner from collision with the half hidden breakwater. These rescues had occurred on the previous day before the storm reached its height. On the 18th, the dy of the thrilling episode narrated below, the tugs were as useless in the leaping sear as a common river skiff in the wildest ocean surf.

At daylight the range of vision was shut in by clouds of snow, but enough of the harbor was laid bare to show the extent of the ravages of 24 hours, the sea of breakers and the vaulting volumes of spray where the waves dashed against the inland bulkheads. As the day grew some of the watchers thought they saw far down the eastern beach the masts of two vessels, which the driving snow clouds now obscured and now unveiled. The spectacle was pointed out to newcomers n the docks, whose sympathies had not been dulled by supping on horrors, and finally a party of men, loaded a small boat upon a wagon and set off down the shore. At the mouth of Chocolay river, some miles, as it proved, from Marquette harbor, they saw two vessels aground on a bar 400 yards from the shore line and opposite the mouth of the river. The wrecks were steam barge and a four masted schooner. They lay stern n the beach, with the sea pouring over their main decks. The barge looked like a complete wreck, being swept from end to end by the waves as she lay low in the water. Occasionally those on shore thought that they could distinguish through rifts in the snow clouds the faces of men peering from the wheelhouse and captain's cabin of the barge. The schooner, although fast in the sand, stood higher in the water and was less at the mercy of the waves. The peril and suffering of the supposed imprisoned crews nerved the people on the shore to attempt a rescue with the means at hand. Five men put off in the yawl, to which was attached a long tow rope held by friends on shore. The wind and surf proved to heavy for them, and they put back again and again. Once the boat shipped a sea which nearly swamped her, and the crew was barely saved by means of the life line, which hauled them back to the beach. A tug then tried to plow through the surf, but was also driven back by the heavy wind and waves.

The crowd at this point was now swelled by arrivals from the landing beach and from the city. Each fresh group had its plan of rescue, and while the baffled crew of the yawl started with their team to fetch mortar for firing a life line to the wreck another zealous crew manned a skiff and attempted to outride the surf and reach the helpless sailors, who, watching the efforts of those on shore, cast off lines attached to water casks in the hope that the current would float them ashore. But the waves tore the casks loose, and the lines disappeared. The skiff made half the distance nobly, then was caught in a powerful current and forced back to land.

Night was now coming on, and the hopes of the would be rescuers turned to the mortar and life line. But the gun had been spiked, and a long time was consumed in getting the vent drilled out. While waiting the crowd built huge bonfires of the driftwood along the beach, coiled down the lines ready for the gun and signaled good cheer to the hapless souls on the wrecks. At 6 o'clock the mortar arrived, and the first shot dropped 60 feet from the vessels. A heavier charge was put in, and the cannon flew into a hundred pieces, fortunately harming none of the crowd standing anxiously about it. The last die had been cast, thought the multitude, whose feelings were harrowed by the sight of doomed men far out in the sear and the futile yet promising attempts at rescue. There was nothing to do but await the breaking up of the vessels, when possibly some of the more vigorous sailors could stem the breakers and reach the shore.

Meanwhile what of those luckless men imprisoned on the bar? Companions in misery, they had been companions in toil. The barge was the Robert Wallace, and the schooner, her consort and tow, the David Wallace. They had been sailing with the wind across the lake, and losing the way in the blinding storm of the previous night stranded on the bar. The heavy seas broke through the upper works of the barge, flooding the engine room and driving all hands into the upper cabins. In short time the hull broke in two, and the after cabins were beaten to pieces by the waves. Fifteen men were cooped up in the wheelhouse and captain's cabin, shut off from their food chests. When night closed in, these men had nothing but conjecture to encourage them in hope. Every attempt at rescue had failed before their eyes. The sound of bursting gun, which, had they understood its meaning, would have seemed death knell, they interpreted as a signal calling for help, and the bonfires lighting up the sea of faces lingering expectantly on the beach strengthened this hope. Had they know that at the moment the means which their rescue would come about were distant from Marquette 110 miles across a waste of drifted snow, and still six miles distant over a beach corduroyed with sea wreckage and also buried in snow, could they have resisted the temptation to jump into the boiling sea and try to outride the breakers?

A message rushed off from Marquette the moment the startling discover made by the yawl crew was known in the city, had been wired across the peninsula and then carried across the lake and up the Old Portage canal by tug, telling the life saving crew of the Ship Canal Station of the danger at Chocolay bar. The dispatch reached Keeper Ocha at 4 p.m. and at 8 o'clock his full crew, with lifeboat and line throwing gun, was on board a special train at Houghton, headed for Marquette, having traveled from the station to Houghton on the tug which bore the news. And now what a thrilling spectacle could it be set upon one stage-the stranded ships; the imperiled crews anxiously peering across the angry, remorseless sea to read in the fire lit faces braving the howling storm on the beach signs of hope to bear up their fainting souls; the speeding train, with its iron horse, bearing in its wake a line of snow capped cars, whose black wheels, whirling through the drifts, send up a windrow of spray matching the foam of the breakers which encircles that perilous lake miles and miles ahead. A half an hour before midnight the relief train, snorting after the hundred mile run, rolled into Marquette more like a fabulous reptile incased in scales of frozen snow crawling out of the black cave of night than a modern useful monster bearing instruments of mercy in its bosom. As the cars slowed up at the station, out leaped the lion hearted crew, ready for the battle with the sea. Across the six miles of heavy beach the equipments were borne in sleighs, and at 1 o'clock the gun and lifeboat stood opposite the wreck. The wild cheering and gestures of the crowd gave new lease of hope to the sailors. Then came the line gun's boom and the steel slug whirling across the barge amidships. But the imprisoned men could not reach the rope, and Keeper Ocha turned to the lifeboat. The rudder had been broken n the reckless trip down and had been patched while the line was being fired.

At 2 o'clock the launch was made, but the first reef the force of the breakers bent the rudder irons and split the timer of the post. The crew retreated to the shore and made another effort to fire a line across the wreck. They succeeded, but the sailors could not reach it, and once more the life savers manned the surfboat, which had meanwhile been repaired. A long and desperate struggle carried her through the breakers, but when she reached the barge she was weighted down with a heavy plating of ice. Nine of the suffering sailors, with the ice clad crew, were all that could with safety venture on the return trip. She was beached at last and instantly relaunched. On the second trip the boat shipped sea after sea and was nearly swamped, but finally the six remaining bargemen, all of whom were benumbed with cold and nearly starved from two days' fast, were landed beside the warm fires.

The trip to the schooner was the most difficult of all. The life savers were handicapped by the accumulations of ice upon their clothing, and the surging of the breakers was tremendous. Their boat was beaten back again and again and once was nearly thrown over at the second reef. The rudder again gave out, and the craft was steered solely by manipulation with the oars. But the crew was indomitable and refused to yield with the rescue half done. Slowly and painfully they labored on, propelling and steering with alternate backward and forward strokes, until at 8 o'clock, after a full hour's struggle, they had the boat alongside the schooner. The return was comparatively easy, and every soul was landed without mishap. Thus a crew of half a dozen resolute men, moved by the spirit of their noble service, had in 16 hours traveled over 100 miles and accomplished a rescue which a thousand novices already on the spot, with all the resources of a port and a city to draw upon, failed to do in an equal space of time.

George L. Kilmer

Newspaper Article, titled Wrecked in Superior, 6-7 Oct 1889 - Houghton, Houghton Co., Michigan

Ohio * Newark * Newark Daily Advocate * 1889-10-07 page 3
Illinois * Decatur * The Decatur Daily Despatch * 1889-10-06 page 1

Wrecked in Superior
The Steamer Bessemer and Consort Schuylkill of Cleveland Go Down - The Crew Save With Difficulty - A Terrible Storm Sweeping Over Superior.

ISHPEMING, MICH. October 7.-A Hancock, Mich., special says: Steamer Bessemer and Consort Schuylkill of Cleveland, were wrecked at the mouth of the Lake Superior ship canal last night. The crew of nineteen men was saved with difficulty by the life saving crew under the command of Captain Ocha. Loss on vessels and cargoes eighty to one hundred thousand dollars. A terrific storm is now sweeping over Lake Superior.



Obituary, Captain OCHA is dead, 23 Nov 1912 - Calumet News, Houghton Co., Michigan

Calumet News, Calumet, MI
Saturday Afternoon: November 23, 1912
Headline: Captain OCHA is dead
Captain Albert OCHA of the Eagle Harbor Life Saving Station died last night of enlargement of the liver. He was well known throughout the district. Until about ten years ago he was head of the Life Saving Station at the canal. He had charge of the station from the time the canal was built until Captain McCormack took his place.
Captain OCHA was then transferred to the Two Hearts Station. He was there until about two months ago, when he was given command of the new Eagle Harbor Station.
Six children of his second wife, the oldest of whom is but 10 years of age, and two by his first wife survive Captain OCHA. Monte R. OCHA first is assistant of the Grand Marais Life Saving Station and one of the two oldest children arrived at his bedside of his father yesterday. The other, Arthur OCHA, is on the steamer "R. Davidson" and is expected at Eagle Harbor tomorrow. The funeral will probably take place tomorrow. Captain OCHA was a Mason and the Keweenaw Lodge of Masons will be in charge of the last rites. Internment will be in the Eagle Harbor Odd Fellows Cemetery.

Military Service, A GREAT RESCUE, 1913 ? - Michigan

A GREAT RESCUE
By Captain Ocha, who, Late in the Fall of 1912, Died at Eagle Harbor Life Saving Station.
By W. H. Law published 191?
Pg. 1-6

The fourteenth day of November 1886 was ushered in with one of the worst northeasters that, perhaps, ever swept over Lake Superior--a bewildering storm of snow and sleet, a regular hurricane. This tempest continued for over three days, and the damage it wrought to shipping was great. Within forty-eight hours after the beginning, over thirty wrecks were reported at Marquette, involving a loss of more than half a million dollars and nearly forty lives. The sea was so violent that vessels at docks were lifted like fallen leaves by the mighty surge and undertow, causing them to snap their moorings as if they were fish lines. Early in the day the seas rolled sheer over the breakwater, endangering all craft in the harbor. By two o'clock in the afternoon the breakers were sheeting freely over every barrier, and little later in the day they tore the wooden tower of the breakwater light from its massive timber fastenings, and set it adrift.

A throng of people had gathered along the piers, ready for any little service, and as they peered out through the appalling tempest, they nearly lost their breath at the sight of a ghostly specter, a schooner shooting madly, with canvas closely reefed, toward breakwater. The tug, "Gillette", gallantly steamed out to her relief, just in time to avert the impending collision.

Many casualties, of similar character were constantly occurring during that awful storm.

The next day, November 18th, the tempest continued with unabated violence. The tumultuous waste of foam-crested breakers could be seen as far as the eye could pierce under the heavy veil of snow. In the neighborhood of the harbor everything appeared to be going to pieces. The breakwater, which had been deprived of the lighthouse tower the day before, now stripped of all its planking, lay bare and bleak, like the skeleton of some monster of the deep, swept incessantly b a wall of water, spitefully spitting its spray thirty feet high. "Great God," exclaimed one man. "What is that I see down the shore, about six miles to the east?" As he pointed in that direction of the lake, others saw two spectral shapes appearing and vanishing through the snowfall. The two phantoms denoted two vessels ashore. The were two vessels belonging to Lorain, Ohio--"Robert Wallace", loaded with wheat, and her consort, "David Wallace". There was a crew of fifteen on one and nine on the other. They had sailed in company from Duluth on their way to Buffalo, N.Y., and were both driven ashore.

After daybreak of the morning of the 18th, a crowd of men who had lined up along the shore saw the two vessels lying stern-on on the beach. They were being subjected to an unmerciful pounding. Immense seas broke incessantly over them, smashing in the after cabin and pouring down the companion-ways into the engine-room of the steam barge, from whence arose great clouds of steam as the water came in contact with the boiler. When the cabin was beaten to pieces the crew of the barge made a rush through the invading water for the forecastle and took refuge in the captain's cabin, shivering with cold and trembling for fear the boiler would blow up. As long as the steam continued the whistle was kept sounding, but so great was the noise of the gale that the crew on the neighboring schooner could not hear it. The steamer had the appearance of a complete wreck; her deck was nearly level with the water, which swept over her from bow to stern. Through the blinding snow an occasional glimpse could be gotten of members of the crew, peeping from the wheel-house and captain's cabin.

The perilous condition of the sailors appealed to every heart. Five men manned a yawl and put out through the boiling surf with a rope in tow, and held by their friends on shore, but they were driven back to the beach. Again they tried, but were hauled back. The crowd on the beach continued to increase, all alive with sympathy and intense anxiety for the fate of the imperiled men. Someone happened to think of an old mortar which was stored in the power mill near the city, and a team was started in all haste for it, the intention being to fire a line over the vessel.

Night was coming on, and the only hope now was to get line to the vessel, that communication with the shore might be effected.

As darkness was approaching the feeling became intense, and the coming of the mortar was awaited with deep anxiety. A delay of hours was occasioned by the old gun having been spiked, and it was necessary to take it to a distant iron shop to have it drilled. "Hope deferred maketh the heart grow sad." Imagine, if you can, the feelings of those shipwrecked crews. Someone started a fire on the shore and willing hands gathered sufficient wood, and soon they had a roaring fire that was not only a means of comfort to the crowd on the shore, but cheerful sight to the sailors. The tongues of the flame streaming into the heavens revealed, through the ghastly whirl of snow against the background of darkness, the beach lined with friendly forms, a restless multitude all full of sympathy and ready for any service.

A cheer went up from the crowd, and everybody knew that the wagon had returned with the old gun. It was at once placed in position for action. By eager hands the line was attached to a twenty-four pound shot and the gun fired, but the charge was so light that it did not carry half way out. The line was hauled back, and the mortar once more loaded. There was a terrific report, the old gun flew into a hundred pieces, and the amazing thing is that no one was killed. And thus it happened that the weary hour of waiting and fruitless endeavor had but a tragic ending.

The boom of the gun, muffled by the roar of the breakers and shrieking wind, was not understood by the suffering sailors, who hailed it as a token that extraordinary efforts were being made for their deliverance. But to the crowd on the shore the booming of that gun announced hope banished and despair begun. It was not generally known that early in the afternoon the level-headed captain, John Frink, of the tug "Gillette", who had rescued several schooners that day, with several other vessel owners, sent a message to the nearest life-saving station, which at that time was the Ship Canal Station, one hundred and ten miles away. Captain Ocha, the hero of our story, was at that time keeper of that station. It was about four o'clock in the afternoon when a telegram reached him, having been sent up to him from Houghton, about six miles away. The captain immediately ordered his crew to prepare for the journey. The captain and crew of the tug that brought the message helped the life-savers to get the life-boat on board, together with the Lyle gun and all the necessary equipment for effective service, and brought them to Houghton, where a special train was waiting for them. By a quarter of eight o'clock everything was on board, and then began a journey such as few have ever witnessed. A passenger coach and two flatcars, hauled by a powerful engine, rushed into the darkness and gale at a pell-mell speed, but as the road was heavy it took them four hours to make the run of one hundred and ten miles. Captain Ocha had thoughtfully wired ahead to Captain Frink to have teams ready to the life-boat and apparatus from the train to the lake, and also to procure a goodly number of lanterns and shovels. Not only did he attend carefully to this matter, but he went around among the merchants and made a generous collection of bread, meat, coffee, butter and cheese for the half-starved men upon the wrecks when they should be brought ashore.

It was no easy task to convey the lifeboat and shore apparatus six miles through sections of woods and over hills and hollows along a rough shore, and that, too, in the middle of the night. Sometimes they were in the edge of the water, then in the snow mixed with sand, or floundering in the driftwood, which, indeed, made it slow and hard traveling, so that it was one o'clock in the morning (November 19th) when they finally arrived abreast of the two vessels.

Here they found a crowd of people still keeping the burning brightly to cheer the despairing sailors. The gun was placed in position, and a line was fired across the steamer amidships, but it appears that the crew were in such a weakened and storm-lost condition that not a man of them had nerve enough to venture out of the wheel-house and go aft to look for the line on the wave-swept deck, so Captain Ocha decided to use the life-boat. It was two o'clock in the morning when the crew manned the life-boat, and with great difficulty and danger they forced it through the surf and out into the mighty breakers. There were two reefs to cross, and before the first reef was surmounted, the boat had shipped three seas. The impact of the waves was so great that the iron fastenings of the rudder was so bent and timber split that they were compelled to go to shore for repairs.

While the rudder was being repaired another shot was fired over the wreck, but the sailors made not response. By daybreak the life-boat was launched again. In crossing the foamy reefs several sears were shipped; the ice was forming fast, so that the crew's clothes became stiff. After a long, hard and desperate pull, she alongside, a weird spectacle, so loaded with ice that they did not dare take the fifteen men of the ship-wrecked crew at one load, so they returned with nine. Instantly the boat was shoved out again, and after another terrible battle with great seas that were tumbling over each other's shoulders, filling the boat again and again to the "gunnels," they landed the other six men. Again they put out, now to the rescue of the nine men on board the other vessel, the "David Wallace." As the life-boat was crossing the second reef she was caught up in such a way that she was nearly thrown end over end, the rudder was nearly broken off, involving double skill and labor in having to be steered by an oar.

The valiant crew were incessantly drenched with the flying spray, which froze as fast as it struck, but with indomitable courage they pressed on, and , finally, about eight o'clock, they reached the schooner and returned to the beach with the nine men on board. As each boat load was landed, the drenched and shivering seamen were taken in hand by the good-hearted crowd on the shore, warmed by the great fires they had faithfully kept burning, and were comforted with hot coffee and nourishing food.

The life-saving crew got back to their station the next day, leaving behind them at Marquette many new friends, who, whenever they think of Captain Ocha and his brave crew, will feel their hearts glow with pride at their glorious achievement.

____________________________

The following letter, type-written and signed with pen and ink, has been mailed to every Congressman and Senator in the United States:

135 Pine St., Detroit, Mich.
February 19, 1913

Honored Sir:-

"Please have patience with me as I tell you in this long letter of the trial and tribulations of a Live (sic) Saver and his family, Captain Ocha, the Hero, Patriot, and Martyr.

"Captain Ocha was to be transferred from Two Hearted Station to Eagle Harbor and hoped to receive orders to go during the Fall of 1911.

"The nearest railroad from Two Heart Life Saving Station on the south shore of Lake Superior is about forty miles away, and the only way to reach it is by an almost impassable wagon road of soft sand. He found it was going to cost him over two hundred dollars to get his household goods to Eagle Harbor on the extreme end of Keweenaw Point by railroad and wagons, so he abandoned the idea entirely, as he could not afford it.

Early in the Spring of 1912, he launched his houseboat that he had built during the winter. When I first saw it, I call it the "Ark" for in some ways it reminded me of Bible pictures of Noah's Ark.

"He built a lighter, or flat bottom scow, fifty feet long and twenty-two feet wide, and a house on it eighteen feet long and fourteen feet wide. In this house-boat, they had a wood range, piano and all their furniture, besides three good sized rowboats, with a full kit of boat builder's tools, for he had been a boat builder before he was a life-saver, and usually passed away his long winters in building boats. His sixteen-year-old daughter, Esther, was to be cook, housekeeper and mother to six children, younger than she, for their mother is dead.

"The Captain had hoped to get away in the early summer, when the weather was good, and as a sailor would say "frog along the beach." He was provided with two heavy anchors and heavy hawsers by means of which he could anchor out in sheltered places when the weather did not please him. The whole outfit he purposed to tow by means of a 12 H. P. gasoline boat, 36 feet long and also a 6 H. P. boat 23 feet long. Before it was possible for him to get started, the Fall storms were becoming prevalent; he realized that it would be impossible for him to ever reach Eagle Harbor with such limited power, and very reluctantly he turned the house boat over to his friend, Captain Ludwick Swanson (for a consideration out of all proportion to the service rendered), who with a 60 ft. gasoline boat, undertook the task. This man, Swanson, is one of nature's noblemen, and he risked his life in rendering this great service to his friend and comrade. He had been in the Life Saving Service for many years, and really pitied Captain Ocha in the trying position he was in, and although now out of the service, there was still a feeling of comradeship.

Captain Swanson well knew the risk he was taking, for with a gasoline boat such as he had, he could not control the house boat in any ordinary wind, and in a real Lake Superior storm, the house boat would simply go where the wind and the seas would take it and the power boat with it, which would finally mean, to destruction.

This man Swanson managed to get the 'Ark,' as it was called, to its destination, but it is doubtful if he would have succeeded, had it not been for a generous hearted Captain of coal a coal barge, who gave him a line and towed the whole outfit for fully 140 miles over the waters that were the most dangerous.

When Captain Ocha was relieved of towing the house boat, he took his family with him in his 35 ft. gasoline boat of 12 H. P. and the 23 ft. boat of 6 H. P. in tow, and made the trip over 200 miles, passing along the beetling cliffs of the pictured rocks, where in places for 15 miles, it would be impossible to even go ashore without being dashed against the rocks, for straight above one's head 250 to 300 ft. high, the rocks are as perpendicular as the side of a barn.

Here is a description of that trip by Captain Ocha in perhaps the last letter he ever wrote. I have quoted the letter to his son, now in the Life Saving Service.

Eagle Harbor, Nov. 4, 1912

My Dear Monty:

Well we had a rough trip. We got to Munising at 7 p.m. the night we left Grand Marais (he had come 30 miles the day before), stayed over night and started out at 6 in the morning.

The wind blew a gale off land. I tried to cross a deep bay above Munising, but when we got out about the middle of it, it got so rough I had to run in against the seas and wind about 6 miles to get in the shelter of the shore. The seas came clear over the little boat and drenched me right through the curtains and the engine also. I thought sure she would stop, but she never missed fire. She pitched so hard it broke the lashings on the bed springs on top, and we lost the trees of them of them and two boat hooks.

We made Marquette at 1 p. m. The barometer was very low and the storm signals were up for a N. W. gale. We had dinner at the Life Saving Station and then went to Emma's (his oldest daughter) and stayed there until Sunday morning.

We left Marquette at 9 A. M. It blew quite hard when we left, but the wind was partly after us, and a heavy dead sea running from the North. The wind increased to a 55-mile gale, but we had to keep right on. It got more off shore after we passed Big Bay. The worst of the whole trip was crossing Keweenaw Bay from Point Abbey to the entry (Portage Entry). I had to head in the wind to keep from rolling over. Had all the weight in the stern and then the seas would come on top of the covering and drench me and the engine. It is the greatest wonder in the world that it did not stop. It was dark too. There was a cruiser came along and I followed him. I couldn't keep any light lit to see the compass, but I could keep with the cruiser. When we made the entry the seas were breaking clean over the piers, and they are not very low either. Cold and wet as I was, I kept right on to McCormick's Station (at the west entrance of the ship canal). We got there at 11 P.M. We got out and fixed the children out with beds, ours were all drenched. Burt (a young son of his), had to pump steadily all across Keweenaw Bay. We left the Portage Life Saving Station at 7 A.M. Monday and got here at 11 P.M.

If it hadn't been for the cover on the power boat, she would have surely sunk. She dove clear under and was nearly half full when we got to the Portage. It was lucky I left the little boat with you. Was sorry I had the other one with me sometimes. I haven't been feeling so well since I got here. I suppose it is on account of the hard trip and not being able to get the right diet.

Sincerely yours,

Albert Ocha



Captain Ocha had been put to considerable expense in moving to Eagle Harbor, then came the additional expense of sickness. All the Life Saving Stations in the Eleventh District, the district to which he belonged, responded cheerfully and made up a purse of over $300 to help in this time of need.

Six months of waiting at Two Heart Station, all torn up and expecting to leave every day, and then the nervous strain upon him and the exposure and the want of proper food, during the dangerous voyage he described, and in spite of the aid of a doctor, he grew worse each day and finally died. And the least I can say of him after many years of acquaintance is, Captain Ocha was a hero, a patriot and he died a martyr after having served thirty years in the Life Saving Service.

Captain Swanson, who aided in the moving of the 'Ark" after completing this task at once started back home and on the way was taken violently ill, an attack of rheumatism brought on by the exposure in being cold and wet for long periods, and as he was passing Huron Island, he decided to land there and obtain help from the light keeper. When he landed, he could not walk alone and the men at the light station had to almost carry him. After staying at the lighthouse for two days and getting no better, he insisted on continuing the journey to Marquette. The light keeper said, 'No, you can't go, you must not think of such of thing, and we dare not leave our post to take you, so here you stay.' 'No, sir, that will never do,' said Captain Swanson, 'I must go home to Marquette, where I can get treatment, for I never will get better here.' He begged and pleaded with such earnestness, that finally the light keeper yielded, and he and his assistant by means of an improvised stretcher carried Captain Swanson from the light house down to the boat. The Captain could not walk, but crawled around on his hands and knees, and put the engine in shape and started going, and then crawled forward and sat on a stool where he could handle the wheel and steer the boat. He made the trip of forty miles to Marquette alone, crawling back and forth when the engine required attention. This is the sort of stuff many of the old time life savers were made of; this brave captain resigned from the life saving service, because of the low wages and the fact that there is no pension, awaiting the old men, who have wrecked their lives in the hardship of service.

"How very simple it would have been for the authorities in Washington to have ordered a revenue cutter, that is often at the Soo, to have taken charge of this matter. Perhaps you will say, "Why that could not be done, for the life saving service belongs to the Civil Service, and is in the same attitude to the Government as the Postoffice Department." Yes, I know that; yea, I Know it to my sorrow, for when I have pleaded with Congressmen and Senators to pass a pension bill that will provide reasonable support for the life savers in their old days, or for their families, when a man dies in the service, some of them say, if we do that, it will open the doors for everybody in Civil Service, everyone in the Postoffice Department will be after a pension.

"The amalgamation of the life saving service and the revenue cutter service would, I think, be most satisfactory and do away with objections of this sort, for a pension is already provided for the men in the revenue cutter service, and there are other equally strong inducements in that service to encourage men to enlist and remain, knowing they are rewarded in the advancing years of their lives and for worthy service.

I can easily understand how the revenue cutter boats could make themselves very useful in disastrous storms on the Great Lakes, and more especially on the ocean, in taking life saving crews with all their up-to-date equipment to wrecks at great distances scarcely possible today, owing to lack of outside assistance.

The government builds great canals and breakwaters and battleships, and encourages the construction of large vessels and the building up of a great marine commerce. The men behind the guns as well as the men in the army are properly cared for with good wages and a pension. But what about the men--the life savers and the light keepers, who often at the risk of their own lives are safeguarding our great marine commerce, are they not also worthy of the most favorable consideration on the part of the government, who servants they are? 'Righteousness exalteth the nation.' It is the humanity, the heart and soul of the country that brings glory to a nation.

When Captain Ocha died, he left twelve orphan children, three girls and nine boys, ranging in age from four years to twenty-four, all of them excellent in physical, intellectual and moral make-up, and if given half a chance, will make good. The oldest boy is a sailor, and the one next to him is following the footsteps of his father in the life saving service, and younger boy has just passed and examination for the light house service.

The government cannot afford to neglect these children. The boys will make the best recruits for the light house and life saving service.

Those who inherit seafaring qualities should receive special consideration from the government. The sad plight of Russia today is due more to the fact that here men are not natural sailors, and all the discipline and training that it is possible to give them can never make up for their inherent deficiencies.

England worsted France and her allies at the battle of Trafalgar for the same reason. The sailors of the island kingdom--Japan, have won for themselves and country imperishable renown, because of their inherited seafaring qualities.

What is it that makes a nation? It is not the extent of territory, nor the mighty resources in agricultural or mineral wealth, but humanity. America whose shores are washed by the salt waters of the Great Deep and by the fresh waters of the "Unsalted Seas," has become first among the nations of the earth, because of the development of a race who depend more upon their ability on the seas than any other single fact. Their mastery of the ocean and the display of their humanity and their hardihood upon it, have made them the masters of their humanity and their hardihood upon it, have made them the masters of nations and men.

I have the honor, dear sir, to remain.

________________________________________
I have since received many encouraging letters in answer to this from senators and congressmen, showing the letter was appreciated.
_________________________________________

A FEW WORD ABOUT THE REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE AND THE LIFE SAVING SERVICE

Pg. 7-8

This splendid department of the Federal Government, the revenue cutter service, older than the American navy, really the mother of the navy, is not fully appreciated because of the general lack of information concerning it, on the part of the public.

The service from the showing of last year's report (1912) surpassed all others in excellent work. There has been twenty-five cruising cutters and eighteen harbor vessels and launches, actively employed during the year. Each of these boats in armed and provisioned and coaled ready for any emergency. They constitute the Marine Police Patrol, which guard the coasts in an unbroken line form Maine to Texas, along the Gulf of Mexico, and from California to Alaska, penetrating the frigid waters of the Bering Straits, and rendering helpful service to the natives of the Aleutian Islands, who are sometimes in the grasp of poverty and disease.

The revenue cutters should be furnished with new and improved and most modern wireless mechanism obtainable that a constant radio watch can be maintained all along the coast from the borders of Maine to the extreme end of the Alaska Peninsula, reaching out to the sealing and whaling vessels passing through the Bering Straits, ever on the alert for a call from any quarter for police duty or rescue work. A total of 260 vessels in distress were assisted during the year 1912, and their burden of 2,212 persons rescued from danger, which n many cases seemed impending death.

Vessels, cargoes and derelicts saved by the Revenue Cutter Service during the year were valued at $10,711,748. Forty-five derelicts and other dangerous obstructions to navigation were removed or destroyed.

Smuggling has greatly decreased in recent years, both on the Great Lakes, and especially on the ocean, because of the vigilant patrol of the revenue cutters. Without this armed coast-guard, extensive smuggling would soon spring into existence along the many miles of coast line of the United States.

Between Maine and Alaska there are 223 Life Saving Stations with a captain and usually eight men of the crew.

Some places along the Atlantic coast there are stations that at present, owing to the changed conditions of shipping, are almost out of commission for the want of something to do, and the same is true of several stations in the Great Lakes. All Life Saving Stations that have out-lived their usefulness should be removed t localities where because of new conditions that have arisen in late years, they are greatly needed. Then, to have several stations, say about 100 miles apart, equipped with a wireless outfit, so that they could keep in touch with the revenue cutters, patrolling the coasts, would render the Life Saving Service more efficient, for all the Life Saving Stations along the coast would be real "Watch Towers" where men are on constant duty from 6 in the morning until 6 in the evening, and all night long, men are taking turns at patrol duty. Every station is provided with a medicine chest, and is really a house of refuge, where anyone who has fallen by the wayside, or has been cast upon the beach from some wreck is properly cared for. This service may in some ways be regarded as the "Red Cross of the Sea" because of its humanitarian records of heroic achievements.

Well-disciplined crews at the 223 Life Saving Stations on the ocean, and the 63 stations on the Great Lakes, all in touch with and working in harmony with the revenue cutters, or amalgamated as one arm of the Federal Government, would make an institution that for achievements would be unequaled by any service of the kind in the world.

In the matter of legislation for the improvement and upbuilding of the life saving service, the government has been liberal. The modern and commodious stations of the establishment, its improved equipment and appliances, are keeping pace with the onward trend of the marine commerce. There are already 146 motor boats at the various stations, and the government is supplying them at the rate of 32 each year. Many of them are 36-fot self-righting and self-bailing life boats.

The failure of the bill that has been before Congress from time to time, making provision for the retirement of disabled and aged men in the service, has been a matter of great disappointment to all who are interested in seeing this most desirable class of public servants provided for when they are no longer able to work.

I find in keeping in yearly communication with all the Life Saving Stations, that there are still in the service some very old men. Several captains of crews, over 70 years old, and should have been retired long ago. A man 70 years of age may be very useful in some departments of the government, but it could scarcely be expected that one of that age would have the nerve and physical endurance necessary in handling a life boat and a crew of men in a disastrous storm.

It is well known that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. A man of great age or a poor oarsman will endanger the life of a crew in endeavoring to make a rescue when a vessel is being wrecked.

Here is a statement from the report of the general superintendent of the Life Saving Service that is most interesting and needs no comment or expressions of admiration from the writer.
General summary of operations since the introduction of the present Life Saving System, 1871-1911:
Disasters 22,771
Persons involved 152,038
Lives lost 1,314
Persons succored at stations 23,555
Days succor offered 53,438

Total value vessels involved in disasters $220,649,945
Cargoes 84,371,824
Property involved $305,021,769
Property saved $245,072,864
Property lost $59,948,902

It should be observed that the operations of the service in the early history was limited in its equipment, both of stations and crews of men, but each year there is an increase in both.

W. H. LAW

135 Pine St., Detroit, Mich.

The copy of this article was obtained from the Wisconsin Historical Society Records. It is also available at the Michigan State Library in Lansing, Michigan on microfilm. Transcribed and donated by the great, great grand daughter in law of Albert Henry Ocha, Patricia Wazny Hamp




Wife Honora HANLEY

           Born: Apr 1867 - Massachusettes
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 

Noted events in her life were:
Residence, 1900 - Brother's Michael Hanley, Franklin Twp., Houghton Co., Michigan



Children
1 F Laura C. OCHA

           Born: Oct 1889 - Hancock, Houghton Co., Michigan
     Christened: 
           Died: Between Jan 1920 and Apr 1930 - California
         Buried: 
         Spouse: James H. BACON (Abt 1884-      )




General Notes (Husband)

Albert stayed on the trip from Two Heart to Eagle Harbor at Emma Bodin's house in Marquette as a rest stop overnight. - From Aurelia Ocha

CENSUS: 1900 Soundex of Federal Census Luce County, MacMillan Twp., Michigan
vol. 46 ed 89 sheet 8 line 44
Ocha Albert H. white April 1863 37 yrs.married 14yrs b. Michigan CanadaEng. England Keeper Life SS
Ocha Georgeanna wife April 1869 31 yrs. married 14yrs. 9children 8living b. Michigan CanadaEng CanadaEng
Ocha Monty R. son b. Oct. 1892 7 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha Arthur sone b. May 1895 5 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha Ester daughter b. Nov. 1896 3 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha Earl son b.Mar 1898 2 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha Albert son b. Sept 1899 8/12 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Beaudin, Anna step-daughter b. June 1885 14 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Beaudin, Jennie V. step-daughter b. March 1887 13 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Beaudin, Eugene step-son b. March 1889 11 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha Ester H. mother b. Sept 1821 78 yrs.Widowed b. England England England immigrated 1845 55
Ocha Benjamin brother b. Nov. 1852 47 yrs. Single b. Michigan CanadaEng England Day Laborer
McIver William Boarder b. Dec. 1860 39 yrs. married 8yrs. b. Scotland Scotland Scotland imm. 1878 12 NA Surfman
Chilson, Richard boarder b. Apr. 1860 40 yrs. Single b. New York Ireland Ireland Surfman
Richardson, Martin boarder b. June 1865 34 yrs. Single b. Canada Eng. New York Canada Eng. imm. 1877 23 NA Surfman

CENSUS: 1910 Soundex of Federal Census Luce County Michigan
vol 51 ed 156 sheet 128
Ocha Albert H. white 48 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Monty K. dau. 17 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Arthur E. son 16 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Ester dau. 14 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Albert R. son 9 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Elmer C. son 8 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Ira J. dau. 7 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Ethel H. dau. 2 yra. b. Michigan
Lawrence F. son NR b. Michigan
2 non relatives

CENSUS: 1910 Federal Census Luce County McMillan Twp Michigan
vol 51 ed 156 sheet 6B
Ocha, Albert Head M W 46 Wd. Michigan Can English Can English Keeper Life Saving Station
Ocha, Monte daughter F W 17 S Michigan Michigan Michigan Fisherman
Ocha, Arthur E. son M W 16 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Ester daughter F W 14 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Earl son M W 12 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Albert R. son M W 9 s Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Almer C. son M W 8 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Ira daughter F W 2 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Ethel H. daughter F W S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Lawrance F. son M W 1-7/12 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Murphy Charles Boarder M W 30 M1 6 Can English Can English Can English1883 Surfman US Lifesaving Serv
Murphy Lucy Servant F W 26 M1 6 0 0 Can English Can English Can English 1894 Housekeeper US Lifesaving Serv

RESIDENCE: Iosco County Plat 1903
Ocha, A H Baldwin Twp R9E 06 1784


General Notes (Wife)

Note that in the 1900 Census Honora (Nora) states that she was married for 13 years and had 3 children and only 1 living.

1900 Soundex Census-Federal- Houghton Co.-Franklin Twp. living with
brother
Michael Hanley-Honora (Nora) Ocha and daughter Laura Ocha-Honora 33 yrs.-
Soundex Entry 1900 under O-200
Ocha Nora vol 27 ed 187 sheet 4
White b. Aug. 1867 33 yrs. old Massachusetts
Houghton Co. Franklin Twp.
Enumerated with Hanley, Michael relationship Sister
---------------------------------
1900 Census Michigan Houghton Franklin Township 6 June 1900 SD 12 ED 181 Sheet No. 4A
50/53
Hanley, Michael Head W M Apr 1864 36 S - - - Massachusetts Ireland Ireland Laborer Shaft House 0
Ocha, Nora Sister W F Apr 1867 33 M 13 3 1 Massachusetts Ireland Ireland Seamstress 10
Hachey, Maggie Sister W F Jan or Jun 1869 31 M 8 2 2 Massachusetts Ireland Ireland -----
?Palworth, Kate Sister W F Nov 1870 29 M 6 0 0 Michigan Ireland Ireland ---
?Palworth, James B-in-law W M Apr 1873 6 - - England England England 1888 12 NA Boiler Maker 11
Hachey, May E. Niece W F Apr 1892 8 S Canada (Fr & Eng) Massachusetts At School
Hachey, Arthur E. Nephew W M June 1894 5 S Canada (Fr & Eng) Massachusetts
Ocha, Laura C. Niece W F Oct 1889 10 S Michigan Michigan Massachusetts At School
---------------------------------
1880 CENSUS: Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
John HANLEY Self M Male W 42 IRE Mine Labor IRE IRE
Margaret HANLEY Wife M Female W 37 IRE Keeping House IRE IRE
Michael HANLEY Son S Male W 18 MA Mine Labor IRE IRE
Hannora HANLEY Dau S Female W 14 MA At Home IRE IRE
Margaret HANLEY Dau S Female W 12 MA At School IRE IRE
Catherine HANLEY Dau S Female W 10 MI At Home IRE IRE
Jerremiah SHANNAHAN Other M Male W 25 IRE Miner IRE IRE
Mary SHANNAHAN Other M Female W 19 MA Care Of Family IRE IRE
Dennis SHANNAHAN Other S Male W 18 IRE Miner IRE IRE
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Census Place Franklin, Houghton, Michigan
Family History Library Film 1254581
NA Film Number T9-0581
Page Number 382A

CENSUS: by 1920 Honora/Nora was no longer living with her brother Michael


Notes (Marriage)

1 _MEND Divorced


Death Notes for Child: Laura C. OCHA

Husband is shown as widower in 1930 census and Laura is living with him while they are boarding with a family.


General Notes for Child Laura C. OCHA

CENSUS: 1900 Soundex Entry O-200
Michigan Federal Census
Ocha Laura C. vol. 27 ed 187 sheet 4 line 36
white b. Oct. 1889 10 yrs. old b. Michigan
Houghton Co. Franklin Twp.
enum. w/ Hanley, Michael relationship niece

1900 Census Michigan Houghton Franklin Township 6 June 1900 SD 12 ED 181 Sheet No. 4A
50/53
Hanley, Michael Head W M Apr 1864 36 S - - - Massachusetts Ireland Ireland Laborer Shaft House 0
Ocha, Nora Sister W F Apr 1867 33 M 13 3 1 Massachusetts Ireland Ireland Seamstress 10
Hachey, Maggie Sister W F Jan or Jun 1869 31 M 8 2 2 Massachusetts Ireland Ireland -----
?Palworth, Kate Sister W F Nov 1870 29 M 6 0 0 Michigan Ireland Ireland ---
?Palworth, James B-in-law W M Apr 1873 6 - - England England England 1888 12 NA Boiler Maker 11
Hachey, May E. Niece W F Apr 1892 8 S Canada (Fr & Eng) Massachusetts At School
Hachey, Arthur E. Nephew W M June 1894 5 S Canada (Fr & Eng) Massachusetts
Ocha, Laura C. Niece W F Oct 1889 10 S Michigan Michigan Massachusetts At School
-------------------------
1910 Census Michigan Houghton Hancock Ward 4 District 120
1001 Fifth St.
Hanley, Margaret F. Head F W 82 Wd - 6 3 Ire. English Ire. English Ire. English 1860 English Own I?????
Hanley, Michael J. Son M W 43 S - - - Massachusetts Ire. English Ire. English surface laborer Copper Mine
Hanley, Margaret H. Daughter F W 38 Wd - 2 2 Massachusetts Ire. English Ire. English none
Hanley Mary Grand Daughter F W 17 S - - - Michigan Can. English Massachusetts none
Hanley, Catherine Grand Daughter F W 35 M1 15 0 0 Michigan Can. English Massachusetts none
Pulver, James Son in Law M W 37 M1 15 - - Eng. English Eng. English Eng. English 1893 NA laborer Copper Mine
Lorocha, Lora Lodger F W 20 S - - - Michigan Eng. English Massachusetts servant Private Family
-------------------------
1920 Census California Los Angeles County Los Angeles Township - Los Angeles City Precinct 176 SD 8 ED 433 Sheet 3A
January 3rd 1920 West 18th Street (148) family 104
Bacon, James H. Head R M W 36 M - - - - yes yes No. Dakota - United States United States Machinist Automobile W
Bacon, Laura Wife F W 30 M - - - - yes yes Michigan United States United States Massachusetts none
Bacon, Laura M. daughter - - F W 3-11/12 S - - - - - - Michigan No. Dakota Michigan none
-------------------------
1930 Census California Los Angeles County, Los Angeles City Assembly Dist. 67 Block No. 626 ED 19-527 SD 17 Sheet 27 A
April 16 1930 130 East 82nd Place
Rogan, Sidney W. Head O 5,00 R no M W 60 M 37 no yes Iowa
Rogan, Idaho Wife F W 66 M 19 no yes Illinois
Dowell, Raleigh E. Boarder M W 24 S no yes California
Bacon, James Boarder M W 46 Wd. no yes North Dakota United States United States Auto Mechanic Garage
Bacon, Marie L. Boarder F W 13 S yes yes Michigan North Dakota Michigan none
-------------------------
Name: WESTFALL, LAURA MARIE
Social Security #: 562050770
Sex: FEMALE
Birth Date: 5 Dec 1916
Birthplace: MICHIGAN
Death Date: 9 Sep 1989
Death Place: ORANGE
Mother's Maiden Name: OCHA
Father's Surname: BACON

SSDI
Laura M. Westfall 5 Dec 1916 Sep 1989 Buena Park, Orange, California California (Before 1951 ) 562-05-0770

Possible 1910 Census
Name: Laura Foster Age in 1910: 21 Estimated birth year: abt 1889 Birthplace: Michigan Home in 1910: Calumet Twp, Houghton, Michigan Neighbors: View Results Race: White Gender: Female Series: T624 Roll: 647 Part: 1 Page: 4B Year: 1910


William Samuel II STANTON and (H)Esther Eleanor Homer HEAL




Husband William Samuel II STANTON

           Born:  - England
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1847 - Brant Co., Ontario, Canada
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Abt 1843-1844 - England




Wife (H)Esther Eleanor Homer HEAL

           Born: 17 Sep-Nov 1820 - England-Check Notes
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Jun 1904 - Grand Marais, Burt Twp., Alger Co., Michigan
 Cause of Death: heart failure, old age
         Buried:  - Rose Hill Cemetery, Grand Marais, Alger County, Michigan


         Father: Benjamin HEAL (      -      )
         Mother: 



   Other Spouse: Antoine OCHA (1812-1896) - 16 Sep 1849 - Dumfrees, South, Dist. Of Gore, Brant Co., Ont., Canada

Noted events in her life were:
Residence, the home of her son Albert Ocha, 1900 - Two Heart River, Macmillan Twp., Luce Co., Michigan

see census under son Albert

Immigration, from England, 1845 - Ontario, Canada

Stated on 1900 census see notes for Albert Henry Ocha whom she was living with.


Children
1 F Sarah STANTON

           Born: Abt 1844 - England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 M William Samuel III STANTON

           Born: 30 Sep 1846 - St. George, Brant Co., Ontario, Canada
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Charlotte THOMAS (living)



3 F Anna STANTON

           Born: 1848 - Ontario, Canada
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




General Notes (Husband)

died of epidemic in 1848 in Paris, Ontario-family story from Marilou Pershiron in Iosco Co. Michigan who searched down many of the older original census material and documented facts on the family.

Esther, William and daughter Sarah (all born in England) arrived in
Paris, Ontario in August 1846 (voyage took about 6 mos. due to shipwreck
and having to stay on a small island until rescued) - from Marilou

At LDS-found on computer-
William and Esther Stanton daughter Sarah Stanton 1843 Buckingham-
christening 27 Oct. 1843- place Newport Pagnell, Buckingham England
dates are close-names correct LOOK INTO



Death Notes (Wife)

from death certificate from County Clerk, Alger County, Michigan.


Burial Notes (Wife)

Talked to cemetery sexton for comfirmation. The grave is unmarked. Had a small broken down fence when we visited and is depressed.


General Notes (Wife)

Iosco County Gazette June 4, 1904
The following item appeared in the last issue of the Grand Marais
Herald, and the person referred to formerly resided in this county, and
will be remembered by many friends, particularly in Wilbur Township.
"Just as we go to press, we learned of the death of Mrs. Ocha,
Mother to Captain Ocha of the Two Hearted Lifesaving Station, which
occurred suddenly at the home of the latter Thursday night. The remains
will be brought here for burial. Captain Ocha has the sympathy of his
many Grand Marais friends in his hour of sorrow."

Iosco County Gazette June 4, 1904 - Samuel Stanton left Friday for
Vermilion U.P. on receipt of a telegram announcing the closing scene in
the life of his aged Mother, Mrs. Ocha, at the home of her son Albert.
Her request to rest in Wilbur with those gone before will be complied
with. The family has the sympathy of many old time friends here.

Iosco County Gazette June 18, 1904-Samuel Stanton returned from the North
on Tuesday, having arrived there in time for the burial of his aged
Mother, which owing to unavoidable circumstances occurred at Grand
Marais. Later in the season, the remains will be sent here for
interment. The deceased suffered a paralytic attack of but a few days
duration and from which she failed to rally.

LDS-IGI Benjamin Heall marriage 1790 Devon to Sarah Carter- Benjamin BD
1795 Devon-could be Esther's Grandparents and Father-names match-dates
are within parameters. Check this out.

DEATH: From Death Certificate

DEATH: Suspect that Esther was visiting or staying with the Cleary's in Grand Marais or other friends at the time of her death.

BURIAL: Cemetery records at time we were there were non-existant - Esther's grave is in a plot by itself with a small fence around it in bad shape and has a large depression. There is no headstone.


General Notes for Child William Samuel III STANTON

died in Bay City hospital or Saginaw?

CENSUS: I believe this is William Samuel Stanton -
1870 Federal Census Port Hope, Rubicon Twp. , Sanilac Co. Michigan
pg. 14 on 22 June 1870
Boarding with Pelletti, Samuel and family
OCHA, Samuel 25 M W Fisherman b. Ontario parents foreign born

1880; Census Place: Wilber, Iosco, Michigan; Roll: T9_584; Family History Film: 1254584; Page: 403.3000; Enumeration District: 147; Image: 0529.
William S. Stanton Charlott Wilber, Iosco, MI abt 1847 Canada Self (Head)
Charlott Stanton William S. Wilber, Iosco, MI abt 1852 Canada Wife
William J. Stanton William S., Charlott Wilber, Iosco, MI abt 1873 Michigan Son
James E. Stanton William S., Charlott Wilber, Iosco, MI abt 1879 Michigan Son
E. Susan Stanton William S., Charlott Wilber, Iosco, MI abt 1877 Michigan Daughter

1900 United States Federal Census Michigan Iosco Wilber District 103
William Stanton 53
Charlotte Stanton 48
James E Stanton 20 Frederick A Stanton 13
Benjamin J Stanton 9


General Notes for Child Anna STANTON

born after her father's death
married George Totten after Laura (step-sister) died maybe in Saginaw in
1921?


Antoine OCHA and (H)Esther Eleanor Homer HEAL




Husband Antoine OCHA

           Born: 9 Mar 1812 - Ontario, Canada
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Mar 1896 - Tawas, Iosco Co., Michigan
         Buried: 1896 - Wilber Twp. Cemetery, Wilber, Iosco, Michigan 1
       Marriage: 16 Sep 1849 - Dumfrees, South, Dist. Of Gore, Brant Co., Ont., Canada

   Other Spouse: Eliza UNKNOWN (      -1848) - 12 Jul 1838 - Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Noted events in his life were:
Naturalization, 21 Apr 1856 - Sand Beach, Sanilac Co., Michigan




Wife (H)Esther Eleanor Homer HEAL

           Born: 17 Sep-Nov 1820 - England-Check Notes
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Jun 1904 - Grand Marais, Burt Twp., Alger Co., Michigan
 Cause of Death: heart failure, old age
         Buried:  - Rose Hill Cemetery, Grand Marais, Alger County, Michigan


         Father: Benjamin HEAL (      -      )
         Mother: 



   Other Spouse: William Samuel II STANTON (      -Abt 1847) - Abt 1843-1844 - England

Noted events in her life were:
Residence, the home of her son Albert Ocha, 1900 - Two Heart River, Macmillan Twp., Luce Co., Michigan

see census under son Albert

Immigration, from England, 1845 - Ontario, Canada

Stated on 1900 census see notes for Albert Henry Ocha whom she was living with.


Children
1 M Anthony OCHA

           Born: Aug 1850 - Canada
     Christened: 
           Died: After 1910
         Buried: 



2 M Richard OCHA

           Born: Nov 1852-Jan 1853 - Michigan
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1853 - Michigan
         Buried:  - Wilber Twp. Cemetery, Wilber, Iosco, Michigan



3 M Benjamim OCHA

           Born: Nov 1852-Jan 1853 - Michigan
     Christened: 
           Died: 8 Dec 1917 - Tawas, Iosco Co., Michigan
         Buried: 1917 - Tawas, Iosco Co., Michigan



4 F Laura OCHA

           Born: Abt 1858 - Michigan
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Dec 1899 - Tawas, Iosco Co., Michigan
 Cause of Death: Consumption
         Buried: 
         Spouse: George TOTTEN (      -      )



5 M Franklin J. OCHA




           Born: Abt 1859
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Oct 1896 - Tawas, Iosco Co., Michigan
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Hattie SLACKFORD (      -      )
           Marr: 2 Dec 1884 - Erie, Ohio



6 M Albert Henry OCHA




           Born: 5 Apr 1863 - Port Hope, Huron Co., Michigan
     Christened: 
           Died: 22 Nov 1912 - Eagle Harbor, Keweenaw Co., Michigan
         Buried:  - Eagle Harbor, Keweenaw Co., Michigan
         Spouse: Honora HANLEY (1867-      )
           Marr: Abt 1887-1888 - Marquette, Marquette Co., Michigan
         Spouse: Georgina (Georgiana) FONTAINE (1862-1910)
           Marr: 13 Aug 1896 - Elyria, Lorain, Ohio




Birth Notes (Husband)

from application for the father's pension from son Joseph's Civil War duty


Burial Notes (Husband)

Iosco Co. Funeral Records, Michigan


General Notes (Husband)

Educated-Could write well-letters he wrote are in Pension File for Civil War Vets of son Joseph Ocha.

RESIDENCE: Iosco County Plat 1903
Ocha, Anton Baldwin Twp R9E 06,07 1785

RESIDENCE: Iosco County, Michigan Early Land Owners, 1841-96
Name Year Township Township/Range Section
Ocha, Antoine 1870 Baldwin 22N/09E 06
Ocha, Antoine 1870 Baldwin 22N/09E 07

RESIDENCE: OCHA, ANTOINE View Image
Land Office: EAST SAGINAW Sequence #: 1
Document Number: 1119 Total Acres: 160
Misc. Doc. Nr.: 2455 Signature: Yes
Canceled Document: No Issue Date: November 05, 1879
Mineral Rights Reserved: No Metes and Bounds: No
Survey Date: Statutory Reference: 12 Stat. 392
Multiple Warantee Names: No Act or Treaty: May 20, 1862
Multiple Patentee Names: No Entry Classification: Homestead Entry Original
have homestead papers

NOTES: Geographic Reference Library American Genealogical Gazetteer State Listings Michigan Ocha Creek Waterway County: Huron State: MI Variant Names: Ocka Creek
Named after Antoine Ocha family - locals call it Ocean Creek

CENSUS: 1860 Michigan Huron County Township: Rubicon - PO Port Hope
Page: (82) 4 Database: MI 1860 Federal Census Index
7 June 1870 House 20 Family 24
Anthonly Ocha 40 M x Farmer 1000 100 Canada
Hester Ocha 35 F x England
Sarah Stanton 15 F x England
Saml. Stanton 13 M x Canada
Anthony Ocha 9 M x Canada
Benjamin Ocha 7 M x Michigan
Franklin Ocha 1 M x Michigan
note children missing Joseph (19 yrs.) son by Antoine's first marriage - Anna Stanton (Hester's by 1st marriage) and Laura Ocha (2 yrs.) same page at bottom with John Helmer
Amy Stanton 12 F x Canada - this is the only other Stanton in the township (age is and birth place is right for Anna Stanton)

CENSUS: 1870 Federal Census Port Hope, Rubicon Twp., Huron Co., Michigan pg. 3
20 June 1870 House 22 Family 21
Ocha, Anthony 60 M W Cooper born Ontario parents foreign born can read - write
Ocha, Sarah 55 F W Keeping House Ontario parents foreign born can read - write
Ocha, Benjamin 16 M W Works in Saw Mill Ontario parents foreign born can read - write
Ocha, Laura 12 F W At Home Ontario parents foreign born can read - write
Ocha, Frank 10 M W At Home Ontario parents foreign born
Ocha, Albert 6 M W Ontario parents foreign born

CENSUS: 1880 Federal Census Baldwin Iosco Co. Michigan
Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
Antoin OCHA Self M Male W 68 CAN Fisherman FRA FRA
Esther E. OCHA Wife M Female W 56 ENG Keeping House ENG ENG
Laura R. OCHA Dau S Female W 19 MI At Home CAN ENG
Albert H. OCHA Son S Male W 17 MI Fishing CAN ENG
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source Information:
Census Place Baldwin, Iosco, Michigan
Family History Library Film 1254584
NA Film Number T9-0584
Page Number 394C

NATURALIZATION: Original Document copy of
Sanilac Co. Dated 21 April 1856
State of Michigan
County of Sanilac
In the Circuit Court for said County
I Anthonly Ocha do solemnly swear that it is my bonafide intention to become a Citizen of the United States and to renounce forever all allegiance to each and every foregn (sic) Prince, Potentate, State or soverignty (sic) whatever, and particularly to the Queen of Great Britian and Ireland of whom I have last been a subject.
Submited (sic) and Sworn to before me this 21st day of April AD 1856 Wm. Austin Clerk
signed Antoine Ocha


Death Notes (Wife)

from death certificate from County Clerk, Alger County, Michigan.


Burial Notes (Wife)

Talked to cemetery sexton for comfirmation. The grave is unmarked. Had a small broken down fence when we visited and is depressed.


General Notes (Wife)

Iosco County Gazette June 4, 1904
The following item appeared in the last issue of the Grand Marais
Herald, and the person referred to formerly resided in this county, and
will be remembered by many friends, particularly in Wilbur Township.
"Just as we go to press, we learned of the death of Mrs. Ocha,
Mother to Captain Ocha of the Two Hearted Lifesaving Station, which
occurred suddenly at the home of the latter Thursday night. The remains
will be brought here for burial. Captain Ocha has the sympathy of his
many Grand Marais friends in his hour of sorrow."

Iosco County Gazette June 4, 1904 - Samuel Stanton left Friday for
Vermilion U.P. on receipt of a telegram announcing the closing scene in
the life of his aged Mother, Mrs. Ocha, at the home of her son Albert.
Her request to rest in Wilbur with those gone before will be complied
with. The family has the sympathy of many old time friends here.

Iosco County Gazette June 18, 1904-Samuel Stanton returned from the North
on Tuesday, having arrived there in time for the burial of his aged
Mother, which owing to unavoidable circumstances occurred at Grand
Marais. Later in the season, the remains will be sent here for
interment. The deceased suffered a paralytic attack of but a few days
duration and from which she failed to rally.

LDS-IGI Benjamin Heall marriage 1790 Devon to Sarah Carter- Benjamin BD
1795 Devon-could be Esther's Grandparents and Father-names match-dates
are within parameters. Check this out.

DEATH: From Death Certificate

DEATH: Suspect that Esther was visiting or staying with the Cleary's in Grand Marais or other friends at the time of her death.

BURIAL: Cemetery records at time we were there were non-existant - Esther's grave is in a plot by itself with a small fence around it in bad shape and has a large depression. There is no headstone.


Notes (Marriage)

Stated in son Joseph's Civil War pension records that Antoine collected after his death.


Birth Notes for Child: Anthony OCHA

Birth date from 1900 Federal Census


General Notes for Child Anthony OCHA

CENSUS: 1880 Census Michigan Emmet Co. Cross Village
Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
David COMMOC Self M Male W 32 SCOT Farmer SCOT SCOT
Grace COMMOC Wife M Female W 32 SCOT Keeping House SCOT SCOT
John COMMOC Son S Male W 8 MI SCOT SCOT
James COMMOC Son S Male W 7 MI SCOT SCOT
Mary COMMOC Dau S Female W 5 MI SCOT SCOT
Margaret COMMOC Dau S Female W 3 MI SCOT SCOT
Antoine OCHA Other S Male W 30 CAN Fisherman CAN ENG
Source Information:
Census PlaceCross Village, Emmet, Michigan
Family History Library Film 1254578
NA Film Number T9-0578
Page Number 364B
-----------------------------------
CENSUS: 1900 Federal - California Sutter Co. Nicolaus Township
1 June 1900 SD 4 ED 119 Sheet no. 1 page 186A
9 9
Ocha, Antone Head W M Aug. 1850 49 Single x x x Michigan France England Farmer Renting
-----------------------------------
From the 1910 Federal Census for Idaho, Washington County, Eaton township, enumeration district 278
Wendy got this information for me from an image of the page.

CENSUS: line: 27 1 dwelling number: 76 2 number of family in order of visitation: 78 3 name: Ocha, Anthony 4 relation: head 5 sex: M 6 color or race: W 7 age at last birthday: 60 8 whether single, married, widowed, or divorced: S 9 number of years of present marriage 10 number of children born 11 number now living 12 place of birth of this person: Michigan 13 place of birth of father of this person: Fr French 14 place of birth of mother of this person: Eng English 15 year of immigration 16 whether naturalized or alien 17 whether able to speak English: English 18 trade or profession: Farmer 19 general nature of industry, business, or establishment in which this person works: apiarist 20 whether an employer, employee, or working on own account: E.A. 21 whether out of work on April 15, 1910 22 number of weeks out of work during 1909 23 whether able to read: yes 24 whether able to write: yes 25 attended school any time since Sept. 1, 1909: no 26 owned or rented: R 27 owned free or mortgaged 28 farm or home: F 29 number of farm schedule: 71 30 whether a survivor of the union or confederate army or navy 31 whether blind (both eyes) 32 whether deaf and dumb over columns 30-32 is written 8-0-0-0
Have been unable to find Anthony in the 1920 or 1930 Federal Census. By 1920 he would have been 70 years old.


Birth Notes for Child: Richard OCHA

Twin brother Benjamin has two birth dates, see his notes.


Burial Notes for Child: Richard OCHA

Family story from Marilou Pershiron


Birth Notes for Child: Benjamim OCHA

1900 Census - living with brother Albert Ocha states born November 1852 - since mother was present at this census this date is more likely to be correct
Obit index from Tawas Michigan states born January 1853


General Notes for Child Benjamim OCHA

Death record of funeral home says 64 years old

INDEX TO THE TAWAS HERALD (Obituaries): VOLUME 2,1900-1929
Ocha, Benjamin - born Jan 1853, died 12/8/1917 (12/14/1917 p1c5).

DEATH: Iosco County Gazette
Ocha, Benjamin - born Jan 1853, died 12/8/1917 (12/14/1917 p1c5)

CENSUS: 1880 Census Michigan Iosco Co. Tawas
Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
Hiram COOPER Self M Male W 34 MI Hoop Maker CAN IRE
Anna E. COOPER Wife M Female W 32 CAN Keeping House ENG ENG
Corrie L. COOPER Dau S Female W 8 MI At School MI CAN
Carrie M. COOPER Dau S Female W 4 MI At Home MI CAN
Verbie E. COOPER Dau S Female W 2M MI At Home MI CAN
Benjamin OCHA Other M Male W 27 MI Hoop Maker CAN ENG
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CENSUS: 1900 counted in census at brother Albert H.'s (brother) house in Luce Co., Michigan


General Notes for Child Laura OCHA

Iosco County Gazette December 28, 1899- Mrs. Laura Totten, daughter of
Mrs. Anthony Ocha of Wilbur and wife of George Totten, died of
consumption at her Mother's home in Wilbur on Monday last. The Funeral
Services were held from the Wilbur Church yesterday and the remains were
buried in the churchyard nearby. The age of the deceased was 38 years.


General Notes for Child Franklin J. OCHA

Frank was appointed Keeper of Tawas LSS on 23 Nov. 1888 and disappeared on 12 Oct. 1896. Found in "Sawdust Days" by Edna M. Otis pp. 57-58 "Wreck Ashore" by Frederick Stonehouse pp.137-138

RESIDENCE: Iosco County Plat 1903
Ocha, Frank Wilber Twp R8E 18 1786

NOTES: The (Iosco) Gazette March 6 1933 (year is faded and hard to read)
OLD TALES OF THE TAWASES
Oct. 9, 1896 (note added)
One of the mysteries of a generation ago, was the disappearance of Capt. Frank Ocha, in charge of the Life Saving Station on Tawas Point. Thirty-seven or eight years ago, Capt. Ocha on his "day off" stepped into a sailboat and crossed Tawas Bay to this city. One of the Life savers, (we call them coastguards, new) asked him to cash his paycheck while here, which the captain did, and returned to the station, where he spent the greater portion of the day. Toward evening he again stepped into the boat, headed for East Tawas and dropped out of sight.

NOTES: Morning came. When the captain did not report for duty, his subordinates thought he might have been detained here for some urgent reason, but when the empty sailboat was found near the commercial dock (where the present dock is located), untied, and with the sails up, it was believed that the captain had fallen out of the boat and was drowned. Valiant lifesavers dragged the bay in the hope of recovering the body of their superior officer, but to no avail.

NOTES: Then someone found the captain's cap inside of some boom sticks that held a raft of logs in place on the bay. This strengthened the theory of foul play, or maybe suicide.

NOTES: But the lifesavers made their investigation of the Point. The captain's razor was gone, likewise his reading glasses; and a gun-this gun was the captain's pride. It was a double-barreled affair. It had once belonged to John Porter (famed for his hunting exploits), and had been made to order. Somehow the gun had come into the possession of Will Reeves, who raffled it, and the Captain won it. The lifesavers pondered much over these things, but they said little. The late James Carpenter who was surfman No. 1, carried on at the Point for a few months, while the Government investigated the affair, and until Capt. Robert M. Small was appointed to the place.

NOTES: The years went by, seven of them. The captain had belonged to the Macabee lodge, and when seven years had passed without a trace of the man's whereabouts, he was declared legally dead, and the family collected his life insurance.

NOTES: Capt. Ocha's parents lived on a farm in Wilber, but in the early days of stagecoaches, they kept a half-way house between East Tawas and Au-Sauble.

NOTES: Old-timers assert that the captain dropped out of sight in Michigan, to join relatives in California, where life was free, more close to nature. At least one person reported seeing him in the west. We do not know; we only know that in re-telling this old Tawas tale we have looked into all the dark corners to assure our selves that all of the ghosts of our childhood days have vanished into thin air.

CENSUS: 1880 Census Michigan Bay Co. Whitney
Name Relation Marital Status Gender RaceAge Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
George FERGUSON Self M Male W 30 NY Fisherman NY NY
Fiddie FERGUSON Wife M Female W 31 MI Keeping House NY NY
Frank OCHA Other S Male W 21 FRA Fisherman FRA FRA
Fred FERGUSON Nephew S Male W 5 MI MI NY
Source Information:
Census PlaceWhitney, Bay, Michigan
Family History Library Film 1254571
NA Film Number T9-0571
Page Number 276A

1894 Michigan State Census
Frank J. Ocha 35 Michigan white Iosco
Hottie Ocha 35 Ohio white Iosco
Ralph Ocha 8 Ohio white Iosco
Fay Ocha 2 Ohio white Iosco


General Notes for Child Albert Henry OCHA

Albert stayed on the trip from Two Heart to Eagle Harbor at Emma Bodin's house in Marquette as a rest stop overnight. - From Aurelia Ocha

CENSUS: 1900 Soundex of Federal Census Luce County, MacMillan Twp., Michigan
vol. 46 ed 89 sheet 8 line 44
Ocha Albert H. white April 1863 37 yrs.married 14yrs b. Michigan CanadaEng. England Keeper Life SS
Ocha Georgeanna wife April 1869 31 yrs. married 14yrs. 9children 8living b. Michigan CanadaEng CanadaEng
Ocha Monty R. son b. Oct. 1892 7 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha Arthur sone b. May 1895 5 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha Ester daughter b. Nov. 1896 3 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha Earl son b.Mar 1898 2 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha Albert son b. Sept 1899 8/12 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Beaudin, Anna step-daughter b. June 1885 14 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Beaudin, Jennie V. step-daughter b. March 1887 13 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Beaudin, Eugene step-son b. March 1889 11 yrs. b. Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha Ester H. mother b. Sept 1821 78 yrs.Widowed b. England England England immigrated 1845 55
Ocha Benjamin brother b. Nov. 1852 47 yrs. Single b. Michigan CanadaEng England Day Laborer
McIver William Boarder b. Dec. 1860 39 yrs. married 8yrs. b. Scotland Scotland Scotland imm. 1878 12 NA Surfman
Chilson, Richard boarder b. Apr. 1860 40 yrs. Single b. New York Ireland Ireland Surfman
Richardson, Martin boarder b. June 1865 34 yrs. Single b. Canada Eng. New York Canada Eng. imm. 1877 23 NA Surfman

CENSUS: 1910 Soundex of Federal Census Luce County Michigan
vol 51 ed 156 sheet 128
Ocha Albert H. white 48 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Monty K. dau. 17 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Arthur E. son 16 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Ester dau. 14 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Albert R. son 9 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Elmer C. son 8 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Ira J. dau. 7 yrs. b. Michigan
Ocha Ethel H. dau. 2 yra. b. Michigan
Lawrence F. son NR b. Michigan
2 non relatives

CENSUS: 1910 Federal Census Luce County McMillan Twp Michigan
vol 51 ed 156 sheet 6B
Ocha, Albert Head M W 46 Wd. Michigan Can English Can English Keeper Life Saving Station
Ocha, Monte daughter F W 17 S Michigan Michigan Michigan Fisherman
Ocha, Arthur E. son M W 16 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Ester daughter F W 14 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Earl son M W 12 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Albert R. son M W 9 s Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Almer C. son M W 8 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Ira daughter F W 2 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Ethel H. daughter F W S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Ocha, Lawrance F. son M W 1-7/12 S Michigan Michigan Michigan
Murphy Charles Boarder M W 30 M1 6 Can English Can English Can English1883 Surfman US Lifesaving Serv
Murphy Lucy Servant F W 26 M1 6 0 0 Can English Can English Can English 1894 Housekeeper US Lifesaving Serv

RESIDENCE: Iosco County Plat 1903
Ocha, A H Baldwin Twp R9E 06 1784


Benjamin HEAL




Husband Benjamin HEAL

            AKA: Benjamin HEEL-HEALL
           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 F (H)Esther Eleanor Homer HEAL

           Born: 17 Sep-Nov 1820 - England-Check Notes
     Christened: 
           Died: 2 Jun 1904 - Grand Marais, Burt Twp., Alger Co., Michigan
 Cause of Death: heart failure, old age
         Buried:  - Rose Hill Cemetery, Grand Marais, Alger County, Michigan
         Spouse: William Samuel II STANTON (      -Abt 1847)
           Marr: Abt 1843-1844 - England
         Spouse: Antoine OCHA (1812-1896)
           Marr: 16 Sep 1849 - Dumfrees, South, Dist. Of Gore, Brant Co., Ont., Canada




General Notes (Husband)

listed on Esther's death certificate as her father "Benjamin Eel"


Death Notes for Child: (H)Esther Eleanor Homer HEAL

from death certificate from County Clerk, Alger County, Michigan.


Burial Notes for Child: (H)Esther Eleanor Homer HEAL

Talked to cemetery sexton for comfirmation. The grave is unmarked. Had a small broken down fence when we visited and is depressed.


General Notes for Child (H)Esther Eleanor Homer HEAL

Iosco County Gazette June 4, 1904
The following item appeared in the last issue of the Grand Marais
Herald, and the person referred to formerly resided in this county, and
will be remembered by many friends, particularly in Wilbur Township.
"Just as we go to press, we learned of the death of Mrs. Ocha,
Mother to Captain Ocha of the Two Hearted Lifesaving Station, which
occurred suddenly at the home of the latter Thursday night. The remains
will be brought here for burial. Captain Ocha has the sympathy of his
many Grand Marais friends in his hour of sorrow."

Iosco County Gazette June 4, 1904 - Samuel Stanton left Friday for
Vermilion U.P. on receipt of a telegram announcing the closing scene in
the life of his aged Mother, Mrs. Ocha, at the home of her son Albert.
Her request to rest in Wilbur with those gone before will be complied
with. The family has the sympathy of many old time friends here.

Iosco County Gazette June 18, 1904-Samuel Stanton returned from the North
on Tuesday, having arrived there in time for the burial of his aged
Mother, which owing to unavoidable circumstances occurred at Grand
Marais. Later in the season, the remains will be sent here for
interment. The deceased suffered a paralytic attack of but a few days
duration and from which she failed to rally.

LDS-IGI Benjamin Heall marriage 1790 Devon to Sarah Carter- Benjamin BD
1795 Devon-could be Esther's Grandparents and Father-names match-dates
are within parameters. Check this out.

DEATH: From Death Certificate

DEATH: Suspect that Esther was visiting or staying with the Cleary's in Grand Marais or other friends at the time of her death.

BURIAL: Cemetery records at time we were there were non-existant - Esther's grave is in a plot by itself with a small fence around it in bad shape and has a large depression. There is no headstone.




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