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93 Results for Gener*

GENEREAU Louis Family - 100%
Edit Louis GENEREAU Family Submitted by: Jim Lalone June 2009 Edit Generation One 1. Louis GENEREAU, b. c. 1818 in IL. Louis Genereau treaty No. 1080 also selected land under Michigan treaty of July 31, 1855. The land selected is section 18, township 15, range 16 W79 meaning west 79 acres in Michigan. This land claim is amended to read W79-63 meaning a 63 foot frontage and recorded under treaty No. 1080. (1) He married Mary Ann _ , b. c. 1823 in MI. Children: 2. i. Louis b. c. 1841/4. 3. ii. William b. c. 1845. 4. iii. Charles b. c. 1847. (2) He married [...]
1838 Claims Against The Ottawa & Chippewa - 51%
[...] report affirmed $77.30 3 MARSAC, Daniel Agents report affirmed $1,449.47 4 GENEROUX, L. Estate of 1/3 deducted from the claim instead of 1/5 $1,349.34 5 GENEROUX, L. Widow of Agents report affirmed $134.49 6 GENEROUX, L. Jr. Agents report affirmed $113.12 7 PRICKETT, James Agents report affirmed $100.00 10 STODDARD, Sarah Agents report affirmed $120.00 11 BULL, Albert E. Agents report affirmed $500.00 14 PORTER, Jno. F. Agents report of disallowance reversed but final decision [...]
GRAVERAET Family Page - 28%
Edit GRAVERAET Family Submitted by: Jim Lalone June 2009 Edit Generation One 1. Gerrit GRAVERAET . He married Sarah HARSEN , (daughter of James HARSEN and unknown). Sarah: "I have stated that Mr. Jacob Harsen was the first purchaser of Harsen's Island. He had a family of seven children, five sons and two daughters. His eldest daughter was the wife of Mr. Graveraet, who settled with him on the island. Immediately after the purchase of the island from the Indians, Mr. Graveraet died, leaving a family of four children, who, with their mother, made their home principally [...]
GENEREAU Louis 1st MI SS Co. K - 27%
Edit GENEREAU Louis Home: Pentwater Oceana Co. Michigan Enlisted: 4 July 1863 at Elbridge Oceana Co. Michigan Age At Enlistment: 18 Term: 3 years Mustered In: 11 July 1863 Co. K, 1st Michigan Sharpshooters Rank In: Sergeant Mustered Out: at Delaney House Washington D.C. 28 July 1865 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: see below Edit Pension Card GENEREAU Louis Late Rank: Sgt. Co. K [...]
1st Michgian Sharpshooters Co. K - MI In The War - 16%
[...] 11th, and the height of the lighting was reached on the next day; said to have been acknowledged by the generals of both armies as one of the bloodiest of the campaign. The rain having continued for two clays, the roads had become totally impassable, and it was only by the most persistent and overtasking exertions that the 9th and 2d corps were joined and put in a defensive position. The rebel general, moving on plank and macadamized roads, took quick advantage of this state of affairs to make a tremendous onslaught upon the 9th corps while thus isolated and unsupported, with a swollen and almost impassable river in its rear. General Burnside, not waiting to be attacked, initiated the action, and the fighting commenced at 4 o'clock A. M. The 1st division (Crittenden's) in front, assisted by the 2d division (Potter's), maintained the action until noon, when the 3d division (Willcox's) was put in, when a most determined and vigorous attack was made by the 1st brigade, under General Hartranft, which drove the rebels into their works and gave the Union troops a most decided advantage, and the division was instantly formed and ordered to assault the main line of works, while, at the same time, as was afterwards ascertained, Anderson's corps of the rebel army had been preparing to charge to dislodge the Union troops. "The Federal line swiftly advanced, with a cheer, to the desperate contest. Answering back came the shrill yell of the rebel hosts, as if in confident defiance. Midway the space between the two lines of battle the two charging columns met, amid the thick smoke of battle, in a dense thicket of pines; the bloody struggle commenced and almost in an instant after the first shock they became mixed in inextricable confusion, and the charge became a series of furious and unrelenting hand-to-hand encounters. At length the superior numbers of the rebels began to force the Union lines to retire; regiment after regiment fell slowly and sullenly back, and the whole left was in retreat. The terrible sacrifice of the troops attest their valor and the magnitude of the struggle. "On a little knoll, among the thick spindling pine, where their rifles commanded the country for their full range, rallied two Michigan regiments—the 1st sharp-shooters, Colonel De Land, and the 27th, Major Moody, while a little back, in a ravine, was the 14th New York Battery, supported by the 2d Michigan Infantry. The combat slowly, sullenly, disastrously rolling down from the left, was bursting upon them, when Colonel Humphrey of the 2d Michigan, commanding brigade, cool as an iceberg and resolute as fate, said: 'Boys, this must be stopped!' The leaden hail pattered and whistled with terrific furor, but the little band stood firm. More than once the bold rebels laid their hands on the guns of the battery only to be driven back by well-directed volleys. A cheer arose, the rebels were checked, broken, but not defeated; in an incredibly short time they had reformed, and again the fearful struggle was renewed. On the right stood the 27th, fighting with unequalled coolness and bravery; everything on the left of the sharp-shooters had been swept away, and the attack on their front and flank, with both infantry and artillery pouring in shot and shell, was terrific; but they gallantly held their ground. On the left of the sharp-shooters were a company of civilized Indians, in command of the gallant and lamented young Graveraet, an educated half-breed—as brave a band of warriors as ever struck a war-path; they suffered dreadfully, but never faltered nor moved, sounding the war-whoop with every volley, and their unerring aim quickly taught the rebels they were standing on dangerous ground. The fighting continued on. Near night a rumor runs along the lines that ammunition is gone, and the cry of 'give them the steel' is received with a cheer. The attack has again been repulsed, and the storm lulls; the fight is losing its horrid fury, and with a fearful burst of artillery it sinks into a scattered skirmish, but not until the darkness came did the battle cease. During this fearful and bloody day Colonel De Land was twice struck and prostrated by the flying missiles, but, badly injured as he was, remained faithful to his command. The regiment lost 34 killed, 117 wounded, and 4 missing. Among the killed was Major John Piper, a brave and lamented officer, who, after several years' hard and faithful service, fell by a shot through the brain." The regiment, in command of Major L. C. Rhines, Colonel De Land being wounded on the 12th, arrived on the banks of the North Anna on the 23d of May, where it was somewhat warmly engaged in several skirmishes with the enemy on that day, losing in these encounters 2 killed, 7 wounded, and 5 missing. On the 26th the regiment again moved by a circuitous route to the Pamunky river, crossing it on the 28th, accomplishing on that day a march of 32 miles. It arrived at Tolopotomy creek on the 29th, where it engaged in skirmishing, with a loss of only 1 wounded. June 2d it again resumed the march, meeting the enemy at Bethesda Church that afternoon, but being in the supporting line suffered but little, having but 2 wounded. On the 4th the regiment marched to Cold Harbor, and lay in the front line during the operations there, its casualties being one killed, 6 wounded, and 10 missing. It evacuated the works at Cold Harbor on the 11th of June, crossing the James river on the night of the 15th. Passing through Grant's great campaign on Richmond with much credit, and crossing the James river, it arrived with its division in front of Petersburg June 16th, and on the next day, while in command of Major Rhines, became so heavily engaged and so specially distinguished in charging and holding the enemy's works, and repelling his repeated assaults to retake them, that this bloody battle became one of the most prominent events in the history of the regiment. The position of the regiment being on the extreme left of the corps, and the 5th corps failing to connect the line after the capture of the rebel works, a large gap was left through which the rebels poured their troops, and most severe fighting occurred; the regiment most gallantly repulsed the enemy in two successive and vigorous charges, taking 2 officers and 86 men prisoners, and the colors of the 35th North Carolina, which were captured by Corporal Benj. F. Young, of Company I, who was promoted for distinguished gallantry on the occasion. During the engagement the left of the regiment became completely enveloped, and was placed in a position compelling it either to surrender or cut its way through the rebel lines; the last-named resort was determined on, and having first destroyed the national color of the regiment to prevent its falling into the hands of the enemy, then commenced fighting its way out, and finally succeeded in getting through the rebel lines. The gallant Major Rhines fell in this desperate struggle, together with 31 killed and died of wounds, 46 wounded, and 84 missing, including among the killed Captain Geo. C. Knight, and among the mortally wounded Captain Thomas H. Gaffney and Lieutenant Garrett A. Graveraet. The former died at Washington, June 20th, and the latter on the 10th of July following. Lieutenant Martin Wager was killed in the trenches on June 23d. From this date to the 30th of July, again in command of Colonel DeLand, it remained in the advanced lines of intrenchments, and was almost constantly under fire. On the 30th of July the regiment led its brigade in the charge on the rebel works contiguous to the fort which was blown up by the "mine," and aided in carried the works, taking about 50 prisoners. The rebels having finally succeeded in retaking the works, it was obliged to retire, with a loss of 3 men killed, Colonel DeLand and 12 men wounded and Captain Dicey, of Company B, and 32 men captured and missing. The regiment, then in the 1st division, remained in front of Petersburg until the 19th of August, when it was ordered to move to the Weldon railroad. Soon after it reached there it assisted in retaking a line of works from which our forces had been driven. Its loss in this affair was one killed and two wounded. It was also engaged at Ream's Station on the 25th, and was there employed in the erection of works until the 28th of September. On the 30th of September it participated in the battle of Poplar Spring Church, with a loss of two enlisted men killed and Colonel DeLand, Captain Bellair and 16 men wounded, all of whom were left on the field and fell into the hands of the enemy. DeLand being wounded and a prisoner, Captain Geo. H. Murdoch, of Company I, succeeded to the command, retaining it until December 16th following. The sharp-shooters being directed to lead the advance of their brigade against the rebel works on the Pegram Farm in this engagement, pushed the enemy out of his first line, but the troops of the 2d division on the right falling back, allowed the brigade (Hartranft's), on the extreme left of the army, and to which the sharp-shooters belonged, to be flanked. The brigade was assaulted by infantry on the right and by Hampton's cavalry on the left, but held the position for over two hours, when it was forced to fall back, passing through a ravine which was enfiladed by a terrible fire of musketry. In this retreat General Hartranft directed Captain Murdoch to rally his men and commence firing, and although the rebel infantry were on the right flank and Hampton's cavalry on the left, yelling, "Surrender, you yankee _ ," which could be heard in every direction, the regiment rallied and delivered several effective volleys, which checked the cavalry, enabling the brigade to rally on the sharp-shooters, when the cavalry withdrew from the field. The regiment was also engaged at Pegram's Farm October 2d, and on the 8th at Boydton Road. On the 27th of October it took part in the movement toward the South Side railroad, and was engaged during the day in skirmishing with the enemy at Hatcher's Run, losing 5 men wounded. On the 28th it abandoned the temporary works which it had thrown up the preceding night, and returned to its old camp, where it remained on trench and picket duty until March 25th following. On that day two companies of the regiment (I and K), in command of Captain Jas. S. DeLand, of Company K, assisted in repelling the assault of the enemy on Fort Steedman, and were in the final charge which drove him behind his works on that occasion, capturing more prisoners than they had men engaged, and with but slight loss to themselves. On April 2d, 1865, the regiment, then in command of Lieutenant Colonel W. A. Nichols and in the brigade of Colonel Ralph Ely, again most signally acquired a very enviable notoriety and great credit for a most daring and brilliant achievement while making a demonstration in front of Petersburg, on the left of the enemy's works for the purpose of drawing troops from his right while our forces were attacking him at other points. After making two efforts, under a very severe fire of musketry and artillery, the regiment succeeded in getting hold on his works to the extent of its regimental front, which it held for an hour under a terrific tire. The object of the attack having been attained, it was ordered back to its former position, having suffered a heavy loss. On the next day, about 4 A. M., then in command of Major E. J. Buckbee, Colonel Nichols having been wounded on the 2d, it was again ordered to advance, under the supposition that the enemy was withdrawing. On moving forward and finding that he had evacuated his works, it pushed on and was the first regiment to enter Petersburg, and while Colonel Ely was receiving the surrender of the city raised the first national flag on the courthouse of that rebel stronghold. The capture of Petersburg was long and anxiously looked for, as leading to the immediate possession of Richmond by the Union forces. It was finally accomplished, the rebel army fled, and Richmond fell. Michigan troops were prominently instrumental in bringing about the result. Colonel Ely's brigade of Michigan regiments, belonging to Willcox's division (1st), 9th corps, were, as previously stated, the first to enter the city and place their colors on the public buildings, raising one flag on the court-house and another on the custom-house, Colonel Ely himself receiving the surrender of the city from the authorities. The casualties of the regiment while in the trenches in front of Petersburg were 27 killed and died of wounds, and 6 wounded. General Wilcox, in the following report of the operations of his division in that affair says: "I have the honor to report the operations of this division in the field from the 29th of March to the 9th of April, 1865, inclusive. "On the night of the 29th of March, at half-past 10 o'clock, the enemy opened on my lines, stretching from above Fort Morton to the Appomattox, with all their artillery of every description and some musketry from their main line. At about 11 o'clock the artillery lulled. I expected an advance of the enemy's troops and was ready to receive them, but no attack was made, and a desultory firing of artillery only continued through the night. "It afterwards appeared from the official reports of the enemy that they thought that we had made an attack; in fact, Major-General Gordon reported such to be the case, and that they had handsomely repulsed us; but although we were under orders from corps headquarters to be ready to attack, and I had caused to be distributed axes for cutting the enemy's abatis, yet no sort of attack was actually ordered or made on our front. "The sensitiveness of the enemy seemed to encourage our men. Preparations were made on the 31st as well as on April 1st for a night attack opposite Forts Steadman and Haskell, 3d brigade, and at a point in front of Ely's brigade, nearer the Appomattox. Through the night of the 2d various demonstrations were made along the line, and the enemy's picket-pits captured at various points, in pursuance of orders from corps headquarters, made in aid of operations being carried on, on the left of the army. "At about 1 o'clock, on the morning of the 2d April, orders were received from corps headquarters to mass one brigade (except garrisons) by 4 o'clock on the same morning near Fort Sedgwick, on the 2d division front, where Gen. Hartranft was to make a real attack with his division and a brigade from each of the other divisions, while, by the same order, I was directed to make a vigorous demonstration along my whole division line with the rest of my troops at the same hour. "Col. Harriman was accordingly detached, with staff officers who knew the road, tools, ammunition, and every possible aid, to report to Hartranft; and this brigade was in position and formed at the moment required. "The demonstration along the line began precisely at 4 by the 2d brigade, Brevet Col. Ralph Ely; 3d brigade, Brevet Col. G. P. Robinson, and Col. Wm. J. Bolton, commanding 51st Pennsylvania, left on the 1st brigade line of entrenchments. Some of the enemy's picket-pits were captured near the "Old Crater" by Col. Bolton. The pickets of the 3d and 2d brigades, strongly reinforced, advanced handsomely, the artillery opened vigorously, and large portions of the enemy were down to oppose what they considered a real attack in force. "On the extreme right, near the Appomattox, a portion of Ely's brigade actually carried some two hundred yards of the enemy's works; but our lines, two miles in length, were too much attenuated to hold the ground. Some seventy-five prisoners were secured and brought in. Three regiments were withdrawn from other points and double-quicked to the point, but before it could be reinforced the enemy had recovered it. "The effect of the movement, however, on the grand result was most happy, inasmuch as it contributed to weaken the enemy's line in front of Fort Sedgwick, where the real attack was completely successful. "For the handsome part performed by Harriman's brigade of this division at the latter point I respectfully refer you to his own report and that of Brevet Major-Gen. Hartranft, commanding at that part of the line. "Through the day offensive demonstrations were kept up, and the batteries playing in aid of the more serious work of the day going on further to the left. “In the afternoon and evening the enemy strengthened their line opposite me; but about midnight of the 2d reports came up from Colonel Ely, commanding 2d brigade, and Col. James Bentliff, now commanding 3d brigade, by virtue of his rank, that there were signs of the enemy’s withdrawing from our front, leaving only their picket line. I gave orders to the 2d brigade commanders to press through as soon as possible. "At about 2 A. M. on the 3d some of our parties broke through. "Bentliff's brigade advanced upon Cemetery Hill and Ely's more directly into town, with a section of Stone's battery. I gave Col. Ely orders to take measures to at once secure order in the city. "At 4.28 one of Ely's flags, that of the 1st Michigan sharp-shooters, was raised on the court-house, and that of the 2d Michigan on the custom-house a few minutes later, and guards were posted about the town." The 2d and 20th Michigan infantry and 1st Michigan sharp-shooters were in the 2d brigade, commanded by Col. Ralph Ely, of the 8th Michigan. The 8th and 27th Michigan were in the 1st brigade. The 17th Michigan were acting as an engineer regiment at division headquarters. Edit Colonel Ely's brigade was in the advance on the morning of the surrender of Petersburg, and on reaching the suburbs of that city was met by some of the principal citizens, when they delivered him the following communication which is a verbatim copy of the original now in possession of General Ely: Lieutenant General U. S. Grant, Commanding the Armies of the United States, or the Major General Commanding U. S. forces in front of Petersburg: General,—The city of Petersburg having been evacuated by the Confederate troops, we, a committee authorized by the common council, do hereby surrender the city to the United States forces, with a request for the protection of the persons and property of its inhabitants. We are, respectfully, your obedient servants, W. W. TOWNES, Mayor. D'ARCY PAUL, CHARLES F. COLLINS. Petersburg, April 3d, 1863. Colonel Ely replied verbally, the people of Petersburg could be assured of the protection of the 2d brigade. The New York Herald had the following report by Thomas M. Cook, formerly of Detroit, and then on the staff of that paper: "At midnight on Saturday (April 2d) General Willcox received orders to make a demonstration on his extreme right, in order to draw as many of the rebels as possible in that direction, and thus assist the attacks that had been planned for the following morning. The demonstration was made with great earnestness at the same time that Admiral Porter was hammering away with his gunboats up the James river. All the artillery on that part of the line was ordered into play, and the skirmish line in front of Ely's brigade was advanced. The moon was yet shining and the night was perfectly clear, so that the attack was distinctly witnessed from the bluffs in the rear. The men moved forward steadily, and soon the sharp volleys of musketry indicated their approach to the rebel lines; the artillery on the heights behind them fired more briskly, the shells shrieking through the air overhead. Then the rebel batteries opened, and the most infernal din was awakened to disturb the placid stillness of the night. Amid the noise and smoke the skirmishers kept steadily on, meeting with so little opposition that they were enabled to cross the rebel lines, enter their works, capture prisoners in numbers greater than their own, and finally advanced into the outskirts of the town, where they met a strong body of rebels coming out to reinforce the portion of the line that had just been captured. A brisk engagement was fought here, within the limits of the city; but our numbers were so small that we were compelled to withdraw, and reluctantly fell back to our own lines. Had the troops been at hand to reinforce the movement, instead of being simply a demonstration it could easily have been turned into an actual attack, and would have given us then the whole left of the rebel line of works and cut them off from Petersburg entirely. General Willcox was very anxious to change the character of the affair, but at the critical moment he received orders to attack at the earliest dawn of the morning on his left, so that he could do nothing more at this time. The success of the demonstration gave rise to the report which was sent away yesterday morning, that we had possession of Petersburg. In the movement we lost a few men only, among them Lieutenant Colonel Nichols of the 1st Michigan Sharp-shooters, seriously wounded. One effect of the movement was most excellent. Lee had mobilized so large a portion of his army against Sheridan that there was merely a picket line left here. The demonstration compelled him to recall some of his troops that had been sent elsewhere in order that he should not be flanked here. "So soon as this affair was over Willcox began massing his few available men for the appointed attack on the left. This was to be a combined and determined attack. The object was two-fold—first, by a more earnest demonstration to recall a greater portion of the rebels who were massed on their extreme right; and second, if possible, to force their lines. "The part of the attack assigned to General Willcox was to carry Fort Mahone, one of the most formidable works on the rebel lines, situated at the point where their line crosses the Jerusalem plank road, and directly in front of Fort Emory, where the left of Willcox's division rested. For this purpose the first brigade, Colonel Samuel Harriman, of the 37th Wisconsin, was brought around from the right of the line and put into position, supported by a brigade of Potter's division of the same corps. While this was being done similar dispositions were making further to the left, and a system of cannon signals had been agreed upon to fix the moment of starting, that all hands might assault slum I timeously. "At precisely 4 o'clock the signal gun was heard. It was scarcely gray dawn, and a considerable mist hung over the fields, so that objects were quite indistinct at a very short distance and not visible at all a few hundred yards away. From this cause the preparation made had been wholly secreted from the enemy. The signal gun, breaking the stillness of the morning, may possibly have been an alarm of danger to them; but as they knew not whence to look, they doubtless simply remained very quiet. "Colonel Harriman advanced at once. A small detachment of his brigade was thrown out as skirmishers, while the rest followed close after in line of battle with fixed bayonets. The men moved very quietly and in perfect order, though manifesting an eagerness of spirit that was an assurance of success. That they went to stay was indicated by their being accompanied by a detachment of 100 men of the 1st Connecticut heavy artillery, prepared to turn and work upon the rebels the guns that should be captured. They passed out into the darkness and all was still. A painful season of suspense followed. Presently a musket is heard, then another, and soon a volley. They have reached the rebel picket line. Now a hearty cheer is heard, followed by a roar of musketry. The cheering and the musketry firing is taken up and runs along "to the left until it is lost in the distance. The flash of the muskets disclose the positions. Instantly the artillery of both sides is at work, and 200 guns belch forth their thunder tones or anger. In the roar of the artillery all other sounds are hushed or drowned. But the work is done. It was done quickly. A second cheer and a second volley from our skirmishers, and the gallant Harriman gave the order, 'Charge bayonets!—double-quick!—charge!' and away the noble follows went, over breastworks, rifle-pits, abatis, and the parapet of the foil into the main work, and the deed is accomplished. For a moment the thunderuck rebels looked, and then took to flight. But our brave fellows were too close after them. They could not all escape. Two hundred and fifty in that single work were sent back as prisoners. Nine guns also were captured, which were quickly trained in directions opposite to where they had been facing and set at work upon other annoying rebel batteries. The glory of the first entrance into the work is disputed by the 27th Michigan and the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. The former had their colors with them, which were the first set upon the parapet, and hence they have the proof of priority. "The importance of this gallant achievement, and those simultaneously made farther to the left, cannot be overestimated. It rent the whole line in two; it separated the right and left wings of their army. If evacuation had been determined upon by them, it closed the main door of escape for then: right wing. Moreover, it took from them commanding positions of great importance and a large amount of valuable artillery. It was not to be supposed that they would yield points of such vital importance to themselves without further effort. "Scarcely were we quiet in possession of the fort, when the rebels, having reorganized their forces and picked up some reinforcements, came up with a determined effort to retake it. They made a most desperate assault, standing up manfully against terrific discharges of grape and canister, and withering volleys of musketry; but it was all to no purpose. The heroic little garrison stood their ground bravely and obstinately, while the artillery of all our forts bent forth murderous assistance in rapid time. The din of the first assault was fully revived. Pandemonium would be a place of rest in comparison to the unceasing roar of that artillery, the shrieking and bursting of so many shells, the yells of the rebels, the rattle of the musketry, and the final cheering of our men as the rebel lines wavered, broke, and finally went back in disorder. Four times subsequently during the day did they attempt to retake this position, but were each time sent back in disorder. It was in one of these assaults that the rebel General A. F. Hill lost his life, while seeking in person to lead his men up to the works. "These successive attacks and repulses consumed the entire day. Meanwhile, however, the 6th and 24th corps, having broken through the rebel lines in their front, were swinging around to their rear and coming down both upon their rear and flank. It was evident then that Petersburg was lost to the rebellion. If they could not retake these works where our lines were extended, how much less their chance when we were concentrating and bringing within reach a force so vastly superior to any they could possibly muster. The day was up with them and they knew it; but now their anxiety was for night; ' Oh, for night or Blucher,' they might well cry. "The movements of the 6th corps were so rapid after breaking their lines that even General Lee could scarcely keep his sacred person safe; as it was, his headquarters were overhauled and fell into our hands. It is reported that they were destroyed. Throughout the early part of the night operations were confined to skirmishing, more or less heavy at different hours, along the entire line. The utmost vigilance was exercised, and it was confidently anticipated that the rebels would take advantage of the darkness to get away. Soon after dark General Willcox was sent for by General Parke, and remained at corps headquarters until midnight, in conference with his superior. At a few minutes past 12 o'clock the rebels advanced and made a demonstration of attack upon the center of our lines. Scattering volleys of musketry aroused the reserves, who, overcome by the fatigues of the protracted day and night struggles could not avoid sleeping whenever a moment's opportunity presented itself. Quickly the lines were in readiness, and every body at his post. Then the firing increased. Soon the forts opened with their heavy artillery. The rebel guns responded briskly. The darkness was intense. A thick mist hung over the country, mixed with the smoke of the past day's battle, rendering it a night of horrid character. Through the thick darkness a bank of lurid light hung over the city of Petersburg, betokening destruction and ruin in progress, and amid it all the unseen attack, the roar of musketry the thunder of artillery, the cheering and shouting of the soldiers, the groping about in apprehension and fear—who can paint such scenes. "But the attack was of short duration. The brave fellows in the trenches knew its import. They appreciated, also, how near they were to a glorious victory, and how important that they should stand their ground without wavering. And faithfully they performed their duty, sending the rebels back bleeding, disheartened, discouraged. Then followed a season of anxious stillness. Not a sound disturbed the quiet of that thick black midnight. No picket firing, no signal guns, no attacks or indications of attack; a terrible, momentous, threatening quiet, which only can be appreciated by those who have spent a night on a battle-field. Orders were issued to the pickets to advance and keep close to the rebel lines. Watch them closely; give them no chance to run; when they start, go after them; no matter for rest—sleep comes after the victory. Vigilance was now all important. "At 3 o'clock our skirmishers occupied the main lines of the rebel works, and orders were issued for an immediate advance. At 3:30 A. M. horses were saddled, coffee swallowed, and away to Petersburg. At 4 o'clock Colonel Ely reported his brigade in Petersburg. The 1st Michigan Sharp-shooters, leading the skirmishers and pressing hard upon the rear of the rebel forces, were the first to enter the long fought for city. With cheers and shouts of triumph they entered; but the fighting was done. At every step they picked up rebels anxious to surrender, but nowhere any willing to fight. Petersburg was ours, won by hard lighting and determined bravery. If there be any confederacy left, its people may seek to give the impression that they evacuated the city voluntarily. A more complete driving out was never accomplished. A victory more signal and indisputable has not been gained in this war. The 9th corps has made a reputation in this grand success sufficient, had it never before achieved distinction, to place it among the most gallant corps of the United States army. Left alone to hold the old lines that formerly had been garrisoned by the army of the Potomac, it not only held them securely, but advanced against the main rebel lines, piercing them in several places, capturing and holding several forts and a score of guns, with a large number of prisoners, holding their advantages and contributing to a very large extent to the glorious achievement that has crowned the united efforts of the whole army. "The 1st division alone, under General Willcox, in their operations of yesterday, not only held the extended line of two miles and over against all attacks, but themselves attacked the strongest positions on the rebel lines, capturing two forts, nine guns, nearly 1,000 prisoners, several flags, etc., and oil with a loss to themselves of about 200 men. And now they add to their record the capture of the rest of the rebel lines, guns, tents, prisoners innumerable, and finally the city of Petersburg. Glory enough for one division. "General Willcox was In the field throughout the whole affair, and directed the operations of the division, as the result demonstrated, with great judgment and ability. His men have behaved with a gallantry that has been seldom equaled. “My route from Fort Emory into the city of Petersburg was by the Baxter road, and led directly across the fortifications of both armies. A more difficult ride it was never my fortune to attempt,—covered ways, rifle-pits, breastworks, ditches, etc.; ditches that could be leaped and ditches wide and deep, parallels and cross sections, abatis and entanglements of every description,—the exhaustion of engineering skill. An entanglement of digging, such as never before was seen, covered the greater part of the distance. For the breadth of more than a mile the country is all dug over. Every manner of earthwork has been thrown up by either army. Corrections of the lines, alterations and changes, have kept the armies busy for a year. It is impossible to describe this vast network of intrenchments from the hasty glance I had while riding over them. The civilian cannot better understand than by conceiving a vast system of sunken roads sufficient for maneuvering armies of 100,000 men, without exposing any above level ground. This is one feature of these extensive works, to which must be added the high and strong breastworks running in zigzag courses, with batteries and redoubts interspersed; and then the advanced picket lines, with the various sunken paths of communication; and behind all the chain of strong forts, with wide and deep ditches, fringed with cheveaux-de-frise, the same as in front of all the other works." The regiment remained in Petersburg for three days, when it marched to a point on the South Side railroad, distant about 20 miles, where it was engaged in guarding that road and on picket duty until after the surrender of Lee, when, with its division, it proceeded to Alexandria, thence marched through Washington and encamped near Georgetown, and on the 23d of May participated in the review of the Army of the Potomac, and returned again to its camp, where it remained until July 28th, when it was mustered out of service and started, in command of Major Buckbee, for Michigan, arriving at Jackson on the 31st. On the 7th of August it was paid off and disbanded. Engagements— North Vernon, Indiana, July 13, 1863; Pierceville, Ind.. July 14, 1863; Wilderness, Va., May 5, 6. 7, 1864; Ny river, Va., May 9, 1864; Po river, Va., May 10, 1864; Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 13, 18, l864; Ox Ford, Va., May 23, 1864; North Anna, Va., May 24, 25, 1864; Tolopotomy, Va., May 29, 1864; Bethesda Church, Va., June 2, 3, 1864; Cold Harbor, Va., June 7, 1864; Petersburg, Va., June 17, 18, 1864; The Crater, Va., July 30, 1864; Weldon railroad, Va., August 19, 21, 1864; Ream's Station, Va., August 25, 1864; Poplar Spring Church, Va., September 30. 1864; Pegram Farm, Va., October 2, 1864; Boydton road, Va., Octobers, 1864; Hatcher's Run, Va., October 27, 28, 1864; Fort Steedman, Va., March 25, 1865; Fort McGilvery, Va., April 1, 1865; Capture of Petersburg, Va., April 3, 1865; Siege of Petersburg, Va., from June 17, 1864 to April 3, 1865. The entire enrollment of the regiment was 1,364, of which it sustained a loss of 4 officers and 65 men killed in action, 2 officers and 42 men died of wounds, 150 men of disease; being a total of 263. "Such memories hallowed we'll cherish- How precious to die with the brave! O shout, Ne'er can Liberty perish— Her saviors confront e'en the grave." Source: Michigan in the War By Michigan. Adjutant-General's Dept, John Robertson 1882 pages 543-552
DELAND James S. 1st MI SS Co. K - 13%
[...] Michigan Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters ONLINE PHOTO Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: none found Edit 1890 Veteran Census Napoleon, Jackson Co., Michigan Page 4 SD1 ED 90 Deland James S. Private F 1st Mich SS Enlisted 29 Dec. 1863 Discharge 27 July 1865 Term: 1 yr. 6 mos. 28 days Post Office: Napoleon Jackson Co. Michigan Disability: Lost use of left arm. Edit Census of the state of Michigan, 1894 By Michigan. Dept. of State page 127 - Napoleon, Jackson County, Michigan: James S. DeLand Edit Pension Card DE LAND James S. Late Rank: Captain Co. K 1 Reg. Mich S.S. Date Of Filing: 1865 August 21 Invalid: Application No. 83555 Certificate No. 56148 Died: 29 October 1925 at Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan Remarks: none Source: NARA Film T289 Roll 244 Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861-1900 Edit Non Military Vital Record Data Birth Date: Nov 1835 Birth Place: Michigan Death Date: 29 October 1925 Death Place: Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan Burial Cemetery: Mount Evergreen Cemetery, Jackson, Michigan Parents: William R. DeLand and Mary G. Keith of Jackson, Michigan Marriage: Marriage Place: Wife: Mary E. (Parker) Note: Surname listed on son Parker R. marriage record. Children: Parker R. b. 01 Nov 1868 in Jackson, Jackson Co., Michigan Gertrude b. 28 Sep 1870 in Jackson, Jackson Co., Michigan Jessie b. 28 Sep 1874 in Jackson, Jackson Co., Michigan Edit City Directories Deland, Jas. S. rms 12 Lincoln av. Publication Title: 1907 City Directories for Detroit, Michigan R L Polk and Co Page-896 James DeLand Jackson, Michigan 1893-1895 jackson City And County Directory 1891. James DeLand Jackson, Michigan 1893-1895 Jackson City And County Directory 1894-95. James DeLand Michigan, Michigan 1896-1899 Jackson City And County Directory 1896. James DeLand Jackson, Michigan 1896-1899 Jackson City And County Directory 1898-99. James DeLand Jackson, Michigan 1899-1901 Polk's Jackson City And County Directory 1900-1901. Edit 1860 Federal Census 2 James Deland's listed both one year apart in age and unsure of which one is the right one. Edit 1870 Federal Census Jackson 3rd Ward, Jackson Co., Michigan page 39 10 June 1870 DeLand James 34 M W Mail Agent 2000 100 Michigan DeLand Mary 32 F W House Keeping Michigan DeLand Parker 1 M W At Home Michigan Edit 1880 Federal Census 5th Ward Jackson, Jackson, Michigan page 2 SD 1 ED 121 01 June 1880 Deland James S. W M 44 Husband Married Mail Agent Michigan Mass. New York Deland Mary E. Deland W F 42 Wife Married Keeping House Michigan New York New York Deland Parker R. Deland W M 11 Son Single At School Michigan Michigan Michigan Deland Gertrude Deland W F 9 Daughter Single At School Michigan Michigan Michigan Deland Jessie Deland W F 4 Daughter Single Michigan Michigan Michigan Edit 1900 Federal Census Name: James Deland Age: 64 Birth Date: Nov 1835 Birthplace: Michigan Race: White Gender: Male Relationship to head-of-house: Head Father's Birthplace: Massachusetts Mother's Birthplace: New York Spouse's name: Mary E Marriage Year: 1868 Marital Status: Married Years Married: 32 Residence : Napoleon Township, Jackson, Michigan Occupation: Farmer Household Members: Name Age James Deland b. Nov. 1835 64 Mary E Deland b. Mar. 1835 65 3 children born 3 living Girtrud Deland b. Sept. 1870 29 Lyda Kilby 63 Boarder Burtor Warters 13 Boarder Edit 1920 United States Federal Census Name: James S Deland Home in 1920: Detroit Ward 2, Wayne, Michigan Age: 84 years Estimated Birth Year: abt 1836 Birthplace: Michigan Relation to Head-of-house: Father-in-law Father's Birth Place: Michigan Mother's Birth Place: New York Marital Status: Widow Race: White Sex: Male Able to read: Yes Able to Write: Yes Household Members: Name Age Stephen M Colter 52 Gertrude Colter 48 Darith Colter 15 Constance Colter 13 De Laud Colter 11 James S Deland 84 Shos Higgans 40 Jack Davison 6 Edit Employment Source: Official register of the United States By United States Civil Service Commission Volume II Post Office Dept. and Postal Service page 366 Railway Mail Service July 1, 1885 James S. De Land Born Michigan Appointed Michigan Where Employed Bay City to Jackson Compensation: $1,000.00 Edit Court Case FINDINGS IN CASE OF JAMES S. DE LAND. LETTER FROM THE ASSISTANT CLERK OF THE COURT OF CLAIMS TRANSMITTING A COPY OF THE FINDINGS FILED BY THE COURT IN THE CASE OF JAMES S. DE LAND AGAINST THE UNITED STATES. December 9, 1907.—Referred to the Committee on War Claims and ordered to be Printed. Court Of Claims, Clerk's Office, Washington, December 4,1907. Sir: Pursuant to the order of the court I transmit herewith a certified copy of the findings filed by the court in the aforesaid cause, which case was referred to this court by the Committee on War Claims, House of Representatives, under the act of March 3, 1883, known as the Bowman Act. I am, very respectfully, yours, John Randolph, Assistant Clerk Court of Claims. Hon. Joseph G. Cannon, Speaker of the House of Representatives. [Court of Claims. Congressional, No. 12169-37. James S. De Land v. The United States.] STATEMENT OF CASE. The claim in the above-entitled case was transmitted to the court by the Committee on War Claims of the House of Representatives on the 27th day of March, 1906. The case was brought to a hearing on its merits on the 18th day of March, 1907. Messrs. Pennebaker and Jones appeared for the claimant and the Attorney-General, by his assistant and under his direction, appeared for the defense and the protection of the interests of the United States. The claimant in his petition makes substantially the following allegations: 1. That he is a citizen of the United States and resident in the city of Detroit, in the State of Michigan. 2. That he, being the sergeant-major of the First Regiment of Michigan Sharpshooters Volunteers, was duly appointed or commissioned by the governor of the State of Michigan as first lieutenant thereof on June 20,1864; and that from and after July 7, 1864, he assumed and performed all the duties of his said grade until September 13, 1864, when he was mustered in as such; said regiment was continuously below the minimum number prescribed by law and regulation, and for this reason and no other he was refused muster and recognition in the grade of first lieutenant during said period. 3. That during said period he was allowed and paid only the pay and allowances of a sergeant-major, although he was in the continuous performance of the duties of first lieutenant. Upon the reports furnished by the War and Treasury Departments and upon other evidence and upon briefs and arguments of counsel the court makes the following FINDINGS OF FACT. 1. James 3. De Land, the claimant in this case, is a citizen of the United States and resident in the city of Detroit, in the State of Michigan. 2. On July 7, 1864, the said James S. De Land was sergeant-major of the First Regiment Michigan Volunteer Sharpshooters. On that date and until he was mustered out of the service, to wit, on September 13, 1864, the same was and continued to be below the minimum number prescribed by General Order No. 182 of the War Department of June 20, 1863, carrying into effect section 20 of the act of Congress approved March 3,1863. (12Stat. L., p. 734.) The first lieutenant of said Company E, First Regiment Michigan Volunteer Sharpshooters, being then and thereafter out of service in said grade, the duties of first lieutenant devolved upon this claimant, who then and thereafter assumed and performed all the duties of first lieutenant of said Company E, First Regiment Michigan Volunteer Sharpshooters. The governor of the State of Michigan also issued to this claimant a commission as first lieutenant, Company E, First Regiment Michigan Volunteer Sharpshooters. 3. On the said July 7, 1864, the mustering officer then and thereafter refused to muster this claimant as first lieutenant of said Company E, First Regiment Michigan Volunteer Sharpshooters, solely because his command was below its minimum strength as aforesaid, although he continued to perform the duties of first lieutenant until he was mustered into the service as such September 13, 1864. 4. During the period aforesaid, to wit, from July 7, 1864, to September 12, 1864, this claimant employed one servant, not enlisted. 5. During said period this claimant did not draw rations from the Government. 6. If the said James S. De Land should be deemed first lieutenant of Company E, First Regiment Michigan Volunteer Sharpshooters, and entitled to the pay of that grade, the difference between his pay and allowances as a sergeant-major which he has received, and that of a first lieutenant, to which he would have been entitled had he been mustered for the period from July 7, 1864, to September 12, 1864, would amount to $202.88 (two hundred and two dollars and eighty-eight cents), as reported by the Auditor for the War Department, including $1.08 income tax erroneously deducted. By The Court. Filed March 18, 1907. A true copy of the findings of fact as filed by the court. Test this 19th day of March, 1907. [seal.] John Randolph, Assistant Clerk Court of Claims. Source: Reports, Documents, and Journals of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. 60th Congress 1st Session December 2, 1907-May 30, 1908 Volume 107. Published 1908. Edit Family Biography We have before alluded to Judge William R. DeLand, the pioneer and the village patriarch, the magnate of the Arcadean age of our primitive history—as indeed we could not avoid doing, as his name is so closely associated with all our beginnings. A more detailed account of Mr. DeLand, however, is necessary to make up our record. William R. DeLand is a native of Massachusetts, and was born July 20, 1794, at North Brookfield, Worcester county, sixth son of Jedediah DeLand, a soldier of the Revolution and a respectable citizen of that town; was brought up in the rural pursuits of husbandry; received a good common school education, of which he became a "high graduate." Taught school for five or six years—from his twentieth to his twenty-sixth year, in Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania. Was married February 25, 1823, to Miss Mary G. Keith, at Caroline, Tompkins County, New York. Returned to his native town in 1824. Emigrated to Michigan in the spring of 1830, leaving North Brookfield April 14 and arriving on the spot on which Jackson now stands May 27, a period of forty days and a distance of about eight hundred miles, whereas the children of Israel were forty years performing a journey of a less distance. On arrival found as "goodly a land" as those migratory Israelites, "a land flowing with milk and wild honey," and plenty of "venison" into the bargain. One of "the first settlers;” took an active part in all its improvements; in the incipient planting of the standard of civilization in this wilderness. Was appointed the first justice of the peace, the only magistrate till the organization of the county in 1833 On the organization of the circuit court, was appointed associate judge of said court for the county of Jackson for four years. Was elected justice of the peace in 1837, county clerk in 1838, for two years, by virtue of which office he was the clerk of the board of supervisors, and issued orders on the treasury for all claims audited and allowed. In 1840 was elected judge of probate. Mr. DeLand has shared largely in the esteem and confidence of his fellow-citizens, having held many offices of honor and profit in their gift and conferred by their kind and generous patronage, and for the bestowment of which he will ever feel grateful. In the discharge of all these public duties he has been regarded as a prompt, faithful and efficient officer. Judge DeLand has also laid his fellow-citizens under obligations for the valuable contributions he has made to our local history. Without his efforts and his care in preserving the records, the light of other days would have, in a great measure, if not wholly, faded away. He has lived to see the little hamlet of four or five houses expand into a great city, and has himself been one of the contributors to that result. May he be spared yet many years, and live to see Jackson double its present size-and prosperity. His sons are Colonel C. V. DeLand. now editor of the Saginaw Republican, residing in East Saginaw, and Captain James S. DeLand, a citizen of Jackson. They were both in the service during the late war, and both severely wounded. These two sons are all the family remaining. Captain DeLand was severely wounded in the last attack on Petersburg, and has lost the use of his left arm. Mr. DeLand’s family consisted, in addition to the two sons above mentioned, of two other sons, who died in youth, and two daughters. The eldest, Semantha, married Benjamin W. Rockwell, and left one daughter, now Mrs. F. A. Palmer, and two sons, Edward W., of this city, and Thomas D., who resides in Leoni Township. She died in 1854. The younger daughter, Lucy, married Dewitt C. Smith and left one son, who died in Portland, Oregon, four years ago. Mr. Smith died in 1858. William R. DeLand died November 26, 1876, aged eighty-four. Mrs. DeLand died two years later, November 28, 1878, aged seventy-eight years. Both died on Thanksgiving day and were buried on the first day of December in each year. Both lived long and useful lives, and were greatly mourned. They had long been foremost in the promotion of all good works, as citizens and Christians, and laid down the burdens of life with no duties unfulfilled, and little to regret. One thing that may be noticed is that of all the old pioneers, who did little or much to promote the growth and welfare of the city, their name does not appear upon any street or place in the city they worked so faithfully to build up from a primitive wilderness. But it will live in history, for no account of the founding and progress of Jackson can possibly be made up if their name and work is omitted. Source: Pages 332 and 333 De Land's History of Jackson County, Michigan: by Charles Victor De Land - 1903 If you can fill in any of the blanks on this person please write. "+message+" "); //-->
BENSUS or BENASIS John 1st MI SS Co. K - 9%
[...] DC Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Extra Note: Algonquin was in Ontonagon and Chippewa Counties at one time. Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: BENASIS BENESUS BENISUS Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Bennesis, James County of Residence: Ontonagon Muster Out Date: July 28 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Bennesis, [...]
CRANE Amos Family Group Sheet - 9%
Edit Amos CRANE Family Submitted by: Jim Lalone May 2009 Edit Generation One Amos CRANE, b. c. 1836 in WI, military 1st MI Sharp Shooters, Co. K (see note 1), d. by 1886. Unsure about marriages. Marriage 1: Emeline _ . Is this Highday in the 1860 census? In Julia’s MR her mother is listed as Emeline. Children: i. Caroline CRANE, b. c. 1869. ii. Julia CRANE b. c. 1873/5. Marriage 2: Charlotte MADOSH, b. c. 1857 in MI, (daughter of Maw-dosh and unknown). Listed as Charlotte HALFDAY on Annie’s DR. Charlotte did marry Joe HALFDAY 19 Nov 1892 L’Anse as Charlotte CRANE, but no indication it is a 2m. for her. Children: iii. Isaac CRANE, b. c. 1877. iv. Annie CRANE, b. c. 1879, d. 25 Nov 1896 in L'Anse, Baraga Co., MI. Marriage 3: Sarah _ . 1880 census. Children: v. Lucy CRANE, b. 23 Jul 1890 in L'Anse, Baraga Co., MI. Edit Generation Two ii. Julia CRANE b. c. 1873/5. Marriage: Married 13 Mar 1893 in L'Anse, Baraga Co., MI, Dougal SHAW, also known as William, b. c. 1865 in Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa Co., MI, (son of Louis SHAW and Marie CAMERON). Children: i. Louis SHAW, b. c. 1894. ii. Frances SHAW, b. c. 1901. iii. Sarah SHAW, b. c. 1903. (2) Marriage license 20 May 1916 in Baraga Co., MI (see note 2), Eli R. CURTIS, b. 1885 in MI, (son of Newton CURTIS and unknown). Edit Notes Note 1 Enlisted: 24 August 1864 at Jackson, Jackson Co., Michigan Age At Enlistment: 28 Term: 3 years Mustered In: 24 August 1864 Co. K, 1st Michigan Sharpshooters Mustered Out: 11 August 1865 at Detroit, Wayne Co., Michigan Substitute for DeWitt C. Leach (Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters) See Military Data: http://www.mfhn.com/native/CRANE_Amos.ashx Note 2 Unsure if the actual marriage took place.
ASHE-KE-BUG George 1st MI SS Co. K - 9%
[...] DC Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name AISHKEBUG AISH-KE-BUG ESTABROOK ASHKBUG ASHKEBOG ASHKEBUG Possible: Eshabau Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Ashkebug, George County of Residence: Leelanaw Muster Out Date: Aug. 14 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit Pension Index Card ASHKEBUG George (alias) ESTABROOK George [...]
CHAMBERLAIN Amos 1st MI SS Co. K - 9%
[...] 1865 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: CHAMBERLIN Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Chamberlain, Amos County of Residence: Isabella Muster Out Date: July 28 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veteran Census not found Edit 1894 Michigan State Veteran Census not found Edit 1883 Pensioners Michigan not found Edit Pension Index Card CHAMBERLAIN Amos Late Rank: - Co. K 1 Reg. Mich S.S. Date Of Filing: 1882 Sep. 26 Invalid: Application No. 460.960 Law: J Certificate No. 379.643 Date Of Filing: 1909 Oct. 26 Widow: Application No. 929.391 Law: A Certificate No. none listed Died: Aug. 18, 1909 Source: NARA Film T289 Roll 244 Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861-1900 CHAMBERLAIN Amos Widow: CHAMBERLAIN Jane Co. K 1 Reg. Mich S.S. Date Of Filing: 1882 Sept. 26 Invalid: Application No. 460.960 Certificate No. 379.643 Mich Date Of Filing: 1909 Oct. 26 Widow: Application No. 929.391 Certificate No. none listed Mich Remarks: x.c. 926.542 Source: NARA Film T288 1861-1934 Edit Michigan Land Record Name: Amos Chamberlain Land Office: EAST SAGINAW Sequence #: 1 Total Acres: 40 Signature: Yes Canceled Document: No Issue Date: 27 May 1871 Mineral Rights Reserved: No Metes and Bounds: No Statutory Reference: 24 Stat. 388 Multiple Warantee Names: No Act or Treaty: February 8, 1887 Multiple Patentee Names: No Entry Classification: Indian Allotment General Land Description: 1 SESE MICHIGAN-TOLEDO STRIP No 16 N 3 W Edit Non Military Vital Record Data Birth Date: August 1835 per 1900 Census Birth Place: Lapeer County, Michigan per marriage record Death Date: August 18, 1909 Death Place: Burial Cemetery: Son's Charlie and Harvey have plots at Riverside Cemetery in Denver Twp. Isabella County, Michigan Parents: Marriage: August 30, 1874 Marriage Place: Nebising, Isabella County, Michigan Wife: Nancy JACKSON Children: Mo Co Ghe Zhick b. about 1875 Harvey b. Feb. 1883 married Maggie Foster 27 May 1910 Charley b. May 1894 5 other children see 1900 Census Edit County Marriage Record Isabella County Clerk Record: 298 August 30, 1874 at Nebising, Michigan Groom: Amos Chamberlain Ind. Residence: Nebising, Michigan Age: 34 Born: Lapeer Co., Michigan Farmer Bride: Nancy Jackson Ind. Residence: Nebising, Michigan Age: 17 Born: Saginaw Co., Michigan Witnesses: Wm. Chatfield, Jr. and John Jackson of Isabella Co., Michgian By: Justice of the Peace Joseph Segot? Isabella Co., Michigan Edit 1880 Census Name: Amos Chamberlain Home in 1880: Isabella, Isabella, Michigan Age: 40 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1840 Birthplace: Michigan Relation to Head of Household: Head Spouse's Name: Jane Father's birthplace: Michigan Mother's birthplace: Michigan Occupation: Farmer Marital Status: Married Race: Indian Gender: Male Household Members: Name Age Amos Chamberlain 40 Jane Chamberlain 30 Mo Co Ghe Zhick 5 Edit 1900 Indian Census 1900 Indian Population Schedule Michigan Isabella Denver Township June 18 1900 Sheet No. 10 Dwelling: 3 Family: 3 Chamberlain, Amos Head In Male b. August 1835 Age 64 Married 25 years born Michigan Father: Michigan Mother: Michigan Farm Laborer Rents House Indian Name: Pe No Se War Nequart Tribe: Chippawa Father: Chippawa Mother: Chippawa White Blood: 0 taxed: yes Citizenship 1867 yes fixed dwelling Chamberlain, Jane Wife In Female b. June 1850 Age 50 Married 25 years 8 children 6 living Born: Michigan Father: Michigan Mother: Michigan Indian Name: O Pe Mareh Wareh Nagua Tribe: Chippawa Father: Chippawa Mother: Chippawa White Blood: 0 Charberlain, Harvey Son In Male b. Feb. 1883 Age 17 Single Born: Michigan Father: Michigan Mother: Michigan Indian Name: Me She She Goy Tribe: Chippawa Father: Chippawa Mother: Chippawa White Blood: 1/8 Chamberlain, Charley Son In Male b. May 1894 Age 6 Single Born: Michigan Father: Michigan Mother: Michigan Indian Name: Ah Narck Tribe: Chippawa Father: Chippawa Mother: Chippawa White Blood: 1/8 Isaac Sarah Visitor In Female b. Nov. 1876 Age 23 Single Born: Michigan Father: Michigan Mother: Michigan Indian Name: O Shar Bo Day Tribe: Chippawa Father: Chippawa Mother: Chippawa White Blood: 1/8 Thomas Charlotte Servent In Female B. June 1873 Age 26 Single 1 child 1 living Born: Canada Father: Canada Mother: Canada Immigrated 1897 years in US 3 Indian Name: Pah She Tah Tribe: Chippawa Father: Chippawa Mother: Chippawa White Blood: 1/2 taxed yes Citizenship 1872 Thomas Esther Daughter In Female b. May 1898 Age 2 Single Born: Michigan Mother: Michigan Father: Canada Indian Name: Tesh Pa Pe Ke Quah Tribe: Chippawa Father: Chippawa Mother: Chippawa White Blood: 1/2 If you can fill in any of the blanks on this person please write. "+message+" "); //-->
ASH-NE-BUY-NEC-KAY or GREEN Amos 1st MI SS Co. K - 9%
[...] 1864. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name ASH-KE-BOG-NE-KAY ASH-KE-BOY-NE-KAY ASKE-BUG-NE-KAY ASH-KE-BUGE-NE-KAY ASHKEBAGONOKAY ASHKEBUGNEKAI ASHKEBUGUEKAY ASHKENE BOG NE KA Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Ashkebuynckay, Amos County of Residence: Oceana Muster Out Date: none given Remarks: Missing in action Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit Muster [...]
1838 Guardianship Genereaux Charles and Lucille - 8%
June 13, 1838 Letter of Guardianship of Charles and Lucille Genereaux Ottawa & Chippewa minor half breeds. Enclose a certified copy of the letter of Guardianship ?? 7th March 1836, app. Louis Campau guardian of Chas. & Lucille Genereaux, Ott. & Chip. Minor half breeds. The power of Attry. From Campau dated 30th utl. Authorizing Jno. P. Huntington to receive all moneys due them under Treaty of 28th March 1836 with the endors. Hon. J. W. Allne on back signed by Huntington. SOURCE: Mackinac Agency Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-1881 [...]
CA-BE-COUNG William 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] 1865 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: CABE-COUNIG CABAICOUNG COWING-CAYBA COWING Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Cabe Counig, William County of Residence: Isabella Muster Out Date: July 28 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit Pension Index Card COWING CAYBA William Late Rank: Cor. Co. K 1 Reg. Mich S.S. Date [...]
BOUSHAW or BUSHAW Augustus 1st Mich SS Co. K - 6%
[...] Michigan Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: BUSHAW BUSHAIS BEAUCHAMP BAUCHAM Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Bushaw, Augustus County of Residence: Emmet Muster Out Date: Aug. 18 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veteran Census not found Edit 1894 Michigan State Veteran Census not found Edit 1883 Pensioners [...]
JONDRAU, Michael 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] Georgia Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: JONDREAUX JONDRO JONDREAU JOURDRON Edit Muster Out Rolls not listed Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit Andersonville Prisoner Records Name: Michael Jondrau Rank: Private Company: K Regiment: 1 State: MI Arm of Service: Sharpshooters Remarks: M. JOURDRON (1)(2); ARM NOT LISTED (1); M. JONDRO, [...]
CHURCH Albert 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] 1865 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: none found Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Church, Albert County of Residence: Saginaw Muster Out Date: July 28 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veteran Census none found Edit 1894 Michigan State Veteran [...]
Native American Cemeteries In Michigan - 6%
[...] Sheridan Indian Link Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3 Section 34, 136th Avenue. Oceana Crystal Genereau/Methodist Indian Link Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3 Section 7, Tyler Road. Oceana Elbridge Indian Link Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3 Section 10, Harrison Road. Oceana Elbridge Indian Link Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3 Section 11, 144th Avenue. Oceana Elbridge Old Indian Burial Grounds Link Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3 Section 17, northwest corner. Ontonagon Rockland Indian Graves Link Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3 Section 25, Deeter Road/County Road 489, Luzerne. Oscoda Big Creek Indian Link Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3 Section 33, Fillmore Street. Ottawa Grand Haven Lakeview Park Indian Link Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3 Section 22, Jackson Street, Saint Helen. Roscommon Richfield Indian Link Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3 Section 24, southeast corner of Hamilton and W. Remington, Saginaw. Brady Hill? Saginaw Saginaw Indiantown Link Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3 Section 23. Saginaw Saint Charles Indian/Wheaton Link Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3 Section 28, Seymour Road. Saginaw Taymouth Found note about Indian Cemetery in Crystal Township, Montcalm Co. MIGenWeb . - Need to investigate. *Section 18 on the Champlain property in the Title: Standard atlas of Montcalm County, Michigan by Geo. Ogle 1897 there is a cemetery shown. This is not listed in the current cemeteries. Section 18 Cemetery is no longer on the map in Standard atlas of Montcalm County, Michigan : including a plat book of the villages, cities and townships of the county...patrons directory, reference business directory and departments devoted to general information / compiled and published by Geo. A. Ogle & Co. 1921
KA-KA-KEE Joseph 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] Virginia Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: ME-She-Ka-Kach Kukakee Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Kukakee, Joseph County of Residence: Macomb Muster Out Date: none given Remarks: Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865 -66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veteran Census none found Edit 1894 Michigan State Veteran Census none found Edit 1883 Pensioners Michigan none [...]
ARNO-WOGE-ZICE James 1st Michigan SS Co. K - 6%
[...] Michigan Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name Awonegezhik ARWONOYEZIA AHAWANEGEZHIK AHNOMGESHEEK AHWONEGEZHIK ARWONAGEZIER ARWONGEEZIC ARWONGEGHIG ARWONGESHIZ ARWONGEZIC ARWONOGEZICE Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Awonegezhik, James County of Residence: Emmet Muster Out Date: Aug. 21 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit [...]
KA-BA-YA-CE-GA George 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] DC. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: Kabayahsega Keabuosga Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Keabuosga, George County of Residence: Saginaw Muster Out Date: Remarks: Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veteran Census none found Edit 1894 Michigan State Veteran Census none found Edit 1883 Pensioners Michigan none found [...]
KA-BA-O-SA Louis 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] DC Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: KUBAOSA KABUCON KA BA OSA KABAI OSAY Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: KUBAOSA, Lewis County of Residence: Oceana Muster Out Date: July 28 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veteran Census none found Edit 1894 Michigan State Veteran Census none found Edit 1883 [...]
BATTICE John 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] VanAkin Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: BATTIES BOTTIS Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Bottis, John County of Residence: Ingham Muster Out Date: July 28 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit Non Military Vital Record Data Birth Date: Birth Place: [...]
COLLINS John 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] D.C. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Collins, John County of Residence: Isabella Muster Out Date: July 28 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit Non Military Vital Record Data Birth Date: Birth Place: [...]
GRAVERAET Henry G. 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] 1864 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: GRAVENTT GRAVERAT GRAVNAET GROWROTT Edit Roll Of Honor Michigan Graveraet Henry G. Co. K 1st Michigan Sharpshooters Age 46 Residence: Little Traverse Emmet Co. Died: May 12 1864 How: Killed in action at Spottsylvania Virginia Edit Pension Card GRAVERAET Henry G. Late Rank: Sgt. Co. K 1 Reg. Mich S.S. Date Of Filing: 1865 January 9 Mother: Application No. [...]
JACKSON, Andrew 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] DC Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: none Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: JACKSON, Andrew County of Residence: Wayne Muster Out Date: June 15 1866 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veteran Census none found Edit 1894 Michigan State Veteran Census none found Edit 1883 Pensioners Michigan none found [...]
GREENSKY Emma widow of Benjamin Widows Pension Application - 6%
[...] declarant and witnesses before signing. Signed: James M. Burbeck Dept. Clerk. Edit Page 5 Adjutant General's Office January 30, 1865 Pension No. 68.228 Receipt of Application.......... There is no evidence on file in this Office that Benjamin Greensky was enrolled and mustered into service in Co. K 1 Regiment of the Sharp Shooters Michigan Volunteers. But the Muster Roll of Co. K of that Regiment, for the months of May, June, July and August, 1864, there is the following evidence of service: He is reported Private Benjamin Gransky, "killed in action at Spottsylvania, May 12, 1864". [...]
HEOGLER Joseph 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] Mich. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: HEIGHTON Edit American Civil War Soldiers Name: Joseph Heogler Side Served: Union State Served: Michigan Service Record: Enlisted as a Private. Enlisted in Company K, 1st SS Regiment Michigan. Died of disease Company K, 1st SS Regiment Michigan on 24 Oct 1864 at Detroit, MI. Source: Ancestry Database Edit Roll Of Honor Michigan Burials HEIGHTON, Joseph 1st [...]
GREENSKY Jacob 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] 1865 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: CREENSKY GREENSKEY GRENSKY GREEN-SKY Edit 1890 Veteran Census none found Edit 1894 Michigan State Veteran Census none found Edit 1883 Pensioners Michigan none found Edit Pension Card GREENSKY Jacob Late Rank: - Co. K 1 Reg. Mich S.S. Date Of Filing: 1880 July 2 Invalid: Application No. 407.565 Certificate No. 236.586 Widow: Application No. 374.134 Certificate No. 268.988 Minor: Application No. 708.513 Certificate No. - Died: June 25, 1888 at Hayes Tp. Charlevoix Co., Michigan Source: NARA Film T289 Roll 244 Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861-1900 Edit Non Military Vital Record Data Birth Date: Birth Place: Death Date: June 25, 1888 Death Place: Hayes Twp. Charlevoix Co., Michigan Burial Cemetery: Parents: Peter Greensky and Susan Marriage: 29 March 1866 Marriage Place: Charlevoix, Emmet Co., Michigan Wife: Esther Duerney or Wa-zhe-me-gaw Children: Peter born August 1869 in Michigan Alice born 15 September 1872 at Charlevoix, Charlevoix, Michigan George born 23 January 1878 in Hayes, Charlevoix, Michigan - married 5 July 1905 in Charlevoix, Charlevoix, Michigan to Susie Fisher Jane born 3 August 1884 in Hayes, Charlevoix Michigan NOTE: Esther Duerney Greensky born Northport, Leelanau, Michigan in 1851 and daughter of John Duerney and Mary Ann Manahemeguguay remarried 05 Oct 1890 at Hayes Twp, Charlevoix, Michigan to Reuben Willis Edit Marriage 2 Marriages, 1856-1931, Vital Records, Emmet County, Michigan P. 62 No. 107. Received 28 June 1866 Jacob Greensky, age 20, of Susan Lake {site of Greensky Hill UMC founded by his father Peter} Ester Wa-zhe-me-gaw, age 16, of Kah-go-ji-wing. In Charlevoix, 29 March 1866, John A. Horton, Justice of the Peace Submitted by: Art Dembinski from Family History Center Microfilm, No. 0966507, Order No. 777074, Locale: U.S.A., Michigan Edit 1860 Federal Cenus Author Note: This is the only Jacob Greensky found in the area. The age if off from the military records but is in line with the 1870 census below. The father's name is probably correct as Jacob named his first son the same. Emmet Co. Michigan, Township of Charlevoix (not a county as of yet) Michigan Post Office: Mackinac Page 35 Date: 14 June 1860 Peter Green Sky 45 Male Ind Preacher 207 305 born Michigan Susan Green Sky 30 F Ind. born Michigan Jacob Green Sky 13 M Ind born Michigan Henry Green Sky 10 M Ind born Michigan Edit Annuity Payment Annuity Payment Roll for the Ottawas and Chippewas of Michgian and the Grand River Ottawa for the year 1861 14. Peter Greensky 1 male adult 1 child Total 2 Payment $9.24 (Chief Shaw wan day se of Little Traverse Band) Edit 1870 Federal Census Charlevoix, Charlevoix, Michigan Page 10 Date: 17 August 1870Post Office: Charlevoix Jacob Green-Sky 24 M Ind. Farmer 250 born Michigan Esther Green-Sky 20 F Ind. Keeping House born Michigan Peter Green-Sky 9/12 M Ind. At Home born Michigan in August 1869 Edit Michigan Land Records Name: Jacob Greensky Land Office: SAULT STE. MARIE Sequence #: 1 Total Acres: 80 Signature: Yes Canceled Document: No Issue Date: 19 Aug 1875 Mineral Rights Reserved: No Metes and Bounds: No Statutory Reference: 24 Stat. 388 Multiple Warantee Names: No Act or Treaty: February 8, 1887 Multiple Patentee Names: No Entry Classification: Indian Allotment General Land Description: 1 N½NE MICHIGAN-TOLEDO STRIP No 35 N 5 W 22 If you can fill in any of the blanks on this person please write. "+message+" "); //-->
JOHNS, William 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] DC Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: John Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Johns, William County of Residence: St. Joseph Muster Out Date: July 28 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veteran Census none found Edit 1894 Michigan State Veteran Census none found Edit 1883 Pensioners Michigan none [...]
CORBIN George 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] 1865 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: none found Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Corbin, George County of Residence: Saginaw Muster Out Date: July 28 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veteran Census none found Edit Pension Card CORBIN [...]
CRANE Amos 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] Leach Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: CRAIN Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Cran, Amos County of Residence: Ingham Muster Out Date: Aug. 11 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veteran Census Michigan Baraga L'Anse Page not listed SD 6 ED 4 Amos CRANE Private K 1 Mich Vol. Enlisted 10 Aug. 1864 Discharged [...]
JACKSON, William 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] DC Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: none found Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Jackson, William County of Residence: Saginaw Muster Out Date: July 28 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veteran Census none found Edit 1894 Michigan State Veteran Census none found Edit 1883 Pensioners Michigan [...]
JOHNS, David 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] DC Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name: JOHN Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: JOHNS, David County of Residence: Cass County Muster Out Date: 28 July 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865- 66, Vol. III Edit 1890 Veterans Schedule Sherman, Mason, Michigan 109 Family 109 Page 2 SD 5 ED 319 Line 23 Name: Ka-wis Mary widow of John, [...]
ACH-AU-NACH Joseph 1st MI Sharp Shooters Co. K - 6%
[...] Michigan Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Last Name ESHKONOK ASHKANAK ACHAWNAEH ASH-CON-OCK ASHKANOCH ASHKENOCK ASHKONOCH ASHKONOCK ACH-AW-NACH ASHKONOIS Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Achawnach, Joseph County of Residence: Emmet Muster Out Date: Aug. 21 1865 Remarks: Mustered Out Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit Pension Card Index ASHKANAK Joseph [...]
A-WON-O-QUOT Peter 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] 1865 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of Name: ANONQUORT ARWONQUETTE ASWANAQUETTE BAMQUETTE BANQOT Banquot-Ononoquot First Names: Petois Peter Petros Pase Pease Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Bomquot, Pease County of Residence: Emmet Muster Out Date: Feb. 20 1864 Remarks: Died in Action of Wounds Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit Civil War Roll [...]
1836 Treaty with the Ottawa, etc. - 6%
[...] out the special directions of the President on this subject, it is agreed, that, in addition to the general fund set apart for half- breed claims in the sixth article, the sum of forty-eight thousand one hundred and forty-eight dollars shall be paid for the extinguishment of this class of claims to be divided in the following manner: To Rix Robinson, in lieu of a section of land, granted to his Indian family, on the Grand river rapids, (estimated by good judges to be worth half a million,) at the rate of thirty six dollars an acre: To Leonard Slater, in trust for Chiminonoquat, for a section [...]
A-GAER-GO Charles 1st MI SS Co. K - 6%
[...] War Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Alternate spellings of Last Name: AGAHGO AGAGO AGARGO AGAWGO AGORGO AGAUGO Edit Muster Out Rolls Name: Agango, Charley County of Residence: Oceana Muster Out Date: Jan. 20 1865 Remarks: Died of Disease Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Michigan, For The Years 1865-66, Vol. III Edit Pension Index Card AGAHGO Charles Co. K 1st Reg. Mich SS Date Filed: 1865 Nov. 18 Widow: Application [...]
1838 Compact of Ottawa at Grand Rapids - 3%
[...] States will deliver to the said Ottowas living south of the conventional line aforesaid, out of the general annuities provided by the treaty, seventeen hundred pounds of tobacco, twenty six barrels of salt, provisions to the amount of five hundred dollars, and one hundred and fifty dollars in money, in lieu of their proportion of barrels. And the respective articles and sums herein mentioned, shall be deducted annually, from the payments and deliveries at Michilimackinac. Art. 4. The Ottawas of Grand River valley, for themselves and the bands living on the waters of the Maskigo, White and Pierre [...]
ISAACS John 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Michigan Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of [...]
HUBERT Charles 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] record. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of [...]
Ionia County - CHIEF COBMOOSA - 3%
[...] oldest resident, who knew them well. Cob-moo-sa was second in command of the Flat River bands, and their general encampment was at the mouth of that river. They had been told by Mr. Dexter, when he located his land the fall before, that he intended to return the following spring with a colony, but the spring was so far advanced before the colony put in an appearance that the Indians had given up their coming and had put in their corn and gardens and disliked to give them up—but upon being paid twenty-five dollars by Mr. Dexter for these and five bark wigwams, they gave up their village and moved a little further away. It was learned that the chief moved about four miles down the Grand river, and for some years made his home on what became the farm of Hon. Alonzo Sessions, now owned by the county of Ionia for a county home. His wigwam was in the bend of the creek- south of where the barn now stands. Source: History of Ionia County, Michigan, Her People, Industries and Institutions Volume 1 Published 1916 By Rev. Elam E. Branch Editor
HANNINS Joseph 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] D.C. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
1853 Petition for Payment Ottawa Colony August Kalamazoo - 3%
[...] Mans shay, Chief, his x mark Nee be ne sy, 2d. Chief, his x mark Joseph Elliott, Interpreter Louis Genereau, his x mark Quah Squah, his x mark Mackinac Agency Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1828-1880 National Archives Microfilm [...]
GREENSKY Benjamin C. 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] 1864 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
1855 Agreement To Stop Whiskey Trade LaPoint - 3%
[...] Bresette John Bte. Bobin Joseph Houlb Francois Houlb Ambrois Corbin Joseph ?anneasy Wm. E. Vantassel Eli Generie by B. Thompson – his x mark Peter Bruce by B. Thompson Charles Rolleaux by B. Thompson Alex Aur?sa by B. Thompson B. G. ?rudtrosy – on fold Wm. Shaw S. Goffs A. W. Bru?tt William Herbert John C. Whipple Mackinac Agency Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1828-1880 National Archives Microfilm [...]
1853 Petition Sault Ste. Marie Bands - 3%
[...] violate, but in order to do this we must abandon our organization as a tribe and our connexion with the general government. The last is the proof of the first. We are members of tribes so long as we approach your pay tables. We have a hard alternative placed before us – to forgo all the benefits of the treaty of 1836, or to reject the proffers of the constitution. We turn to you as the only power that can aid us and request that you will communicate our wants to Congress. By the treaty of 1836, we bound ourselves to remove west of the Mississippi. You guaranteed us a permanent settlement and lands [...]
HALL Cornelius 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] given Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit 1890 Veteran Census [...]
HAMBLIN James M. 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] 11260. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
Murder Of The Glass Family - 3%
[...] inmates of the house for the plunder it contained. As suspicion fell upon the Indians of the vicinity generally, efforts were made to trace the crime to some individual or family, so as to release the others from foul an imputation. With this view the Indians were requested to report any circumstance that would throw a sus­picion on any individual or family of the tribe. A band of Chippewa had long resided at the Ob-to-wach-awen reservation, situated on the Tittabawas­see, whose chief was Pa-mos-e-gay, with whom, at the time of which I am writing, I had been acquainted nearly ten years, and whom [...]
GRUET Peter 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] 1863 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit 2nd Enlistment Name: [...]
ISAACS William 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] D.C. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
Kaw-baw-gam, Charles Memorial Report 1902 Marquette - 3%
[...] idle or lazy. Did not drink, never was arrested, and never fought his own race or any other. He was generous and helpful to all about him. He walked so erect, and looked so vigorous and strong up to the time of his fatal illuess, only a few weeks before his death, that many people expressed doubts about his being a hundred years old. All the proof that I have to offer that he did reach this age is that on the 18th of May, 1849, the first time I ever saw him, I asked him how old he was. He replied in his own language, "Just fifty," and he explained just where he had lived in those fifty years. He looked to be fifty and I believed him implicitly, and since that day fifty-four long years have rolled around. I feel sure that he was 104 when he died. The citizens are just now making a contract for a bronze statue of heroic size of him, to be erected over his grave on Presque Isle, to be unveiled in July, 1904. Historical collections By Michigan State Historical Society, Michigan Historical Commission Vol. XXXIII pub. 1904
1807 Treaty With the Ottawa Etc. - Detroit - 3%
[...] mark, L. S. In presence of: George McDougall, chief judge court D. H. and D. C. Rush, attorney general. Jacob Visger, associate judge of the D. court. Jos. Watson, secretary to the legislature of Michigan. Abijah Hull, surveyor for Michigan Territory. Harris H. Hickman, counsellor at law. Abraham Fuller Hull, counsellor at law and secretary to the Commission. Sworn Interpreters: Whitmore Knaggs William Walker SOURCE: Indian Affairs, Laws and Treaties Vol. II [...]
1824-1825 Licenses Issued At Michigan Superintendency - 3%
[...] Michilimackinac Grand River CAWNE Pierre Michilimackinac Grand River GENEREUX Lewis Michilimackinac Grand River NEWMEMVILLE Joseph Michilimackinac Grand River 4200.00 6100.00 dollars [...]
CHATFIELD W. Samuel 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Virginia Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
Main Page - 3%
[...] the same time, volunteers were found who were willing to coordinate the collection of databases and generally oversee the contents of each project web site. My name is Patricia Wazny-Hamp, and I am the person responsible for Native Americans In Michigan Project . If you would like to contribute your information to this site, please let me know. If you would like to host a MIGenWeb county, or volunteer in another area of the MIGenWeb Project, contact Jan Cortez at the The MIGenWeb Project .
1828 Licenses Granted at Michilimackinac Agency - 3%
[...] Joseph Dailly Muskgon River 500.00 1,500.00 W & T Brewster Oct. 20 Louis Generoux Co?hon Village 500.00 1,500.00 W & T Brewster SOURCE: Mackinac [...]
1826 Treaty with the Chippewa - 3%
[...] said Treaty, to explain its stipulations and to call upon the whole Chippewa tribe, assembled at their general council fire, to give their formal assent thereto, that the peace which has been concluded may be rendered permanent, therefore - Article 1. The Chiefs and Warriors of the Chippewa Tribe of Indians hereby fully assent to the Treaty concluded in August last at Prairie du Chien, and engage to observe and fulfil the stipulations thereof. Article 2. A deputation shall be sent by the Chippewas to the Treaty to be held in 1827, at Green Bay, with full power to arrange and fix the boundary [...]
JAMES George July 4, 1922 - 3%
[...] Bay, Michigan George A James Head O F Male Indian 69 Married Michigan Michigan Michigan Farming General Farm Lucy James Wife Female Indian 61 Married Michigan Michigan Michigan None Northy James Son Female Indian 26 Single Michigan Michigan Michigan Laborer Working Out Owen J James Son Male Indian 23 Single Michigan Michigan Michigan Laborer Working Out Lena K James Daughter Female Indian 19 Single Michigan Michigan Michigan (Northy James transcribed as is.) Edit 1910 United States Federal Census - Indian [...]
1838 Claimants from Mackinac Agency - 3%
[...] EDWARDS Thomas 84 ERMATINGER George 3 EWINGS E. R. 78 FRAIROTS Francis 99 GENEREAUX L. In. 123 GODFROY Peter 103 GODFROY Richard 106 GREAVREOT H. S. 62 HAMBLIN [...]
JACKO John 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Michigan Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
1826 Treaty with The Potawatami - Carey Mission - 3%
[...] from Lake Michigan, by the way of Indianapolis, to some convenient point on the Ohio river. And the General Assembly of the State of Indiana shall have a right to locate the said road, and to apply the said sections, or the proceeds thereof, to the making of the same, or any part thereof; and the said grant shall be at their sole disposal. Article 3. In consideration of the cessions in the first article, the United States agree to pay to the Potawattamie tribe, an annuity of two thousand dollars in silver, for the term of twenty-two years, and also to provide and support a black-smith for them [...]
1828 Treaty with The Potawatami at Mission on St. Joseph River - 3%
[...] commissioners A. Edwards, president of the legislative council R. A. Forsyth D. G. Jones Walter Wilson, major general Indiana Militia Calvin Britain E. Reed APPENDIX II Schedule of claims referred to in the fourth article of the treaty of [...]
1836 Report of Investigation by Kintzing Pritchette - 3%
[...] their Farms, Farmers, Traders and Missionaries residing among them and all matters connected with their general welfare and conditions I have the honor to Report: That the Farming guaranteed to the Chippewas under the treaty of Saginaw, concluded on the 26th day of September, 1819, is apportioned, and allotted amongst the several Indian Farmers as follows: Thomas Simpson, the principal Farmer resides at the town of Saginaw and has the general superintendence of the other Farmers and the directions of their labors. He ploughs certain fields at the Forks of the Titibawssee (sic) River about 25 [...]
GOING Samuel 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] 1864 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
CARTER Charles 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Virginia Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Note: Hagerstown from Honor [...]
ALLEN Charles 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] 1864. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of [...]
ANOTAGAN or AMDARLING Peter 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Not listed in Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 - Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 - First Michigan Sharpshooters. Alternate spellings of Last [...]
CHATFIELD Charles 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] record Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of [...]
1st MI Sharpshooters Co. K - THE INDIAN COMPANY - 3%
[...] COMPANY A company of Indian soldiers from the Arbre Croche country fought in the Civil War under General Grant from the battle of the Wilderness until the surrender of the Confederates at Appomattox Court House. Company K, First Michigan Sharpshooters, was mustered into service January 12, 1863; was stationed for a time at Fort Dearborn to guard the State arsenal at that place and soon after was ordered to the front. With Grant the Indians crossed the Rapidan and received their baptism of fire in the terrible battle of the Wilderness. They also took part in the hard-fought engagements of Spottsylvania Court House, Cold Harbor and Petersburg, and letters received home from superior officers stated that these men were among the best soldiers in the service, gallantly charging in direct assault as well as doing effective sharpshooting and picket duty. Although being dispossessed at home, they fought as valiantly under the Stars and Stripes as their ancestors did under the plumes of the wild American eagle, and let it be said in all justice that they cast a glamour over the annals of the North that shall not easily be effaced. Of the hundred men who left to fight for their country, more than half were killed in battle and practically all the rest were wounded. At the present time there are but two survivors. Lieut. Garrett A. Gravaraet, who recruited the Indians and organized the company, brilliantly led his men in a daring charge at Spottsylvania after seeing his father shot dead at his side. At Petersburg, he was badly wounded in the left arm and died the first day of July following at Army Square Hospital, Washington, D.C. Lieut. Graveraet was a talented young man, an accomplished artist and a splendid musician. He was one of the first government teachers of the Indians at L’Arbre Croche and had great influence among the natives. Always honorable and straightforward in his dealings with them, his confidence was never betrayed and “My Indians,” as he loved to call them, proved true and lasting friends. The remnants of the little band were among the first to enter Richmond to share in the great victory the North had won. An amusing incident is related of Antoine Tabayant, one of the member of the Indian company. Twins, two boys, were born to him, after he had gone to the front, and Mrs. Tabayant at once wrote to her husband asking what names should be given them, for in the Indian custom it was the father’s sacred prerogative to christen his sons. Antoine answered immediately to call one Abraham Lincoln and the other Jefferson Davis. His wife did as requested and the twins grew up to be lively youngsters; but sad to relate, both died before Antoine returned home from the war. He did not know it, however, and as soon as he met his wife, after being mustered out, he inquired about the boys. Sorrowfully the mother informed him of their death. For a time the old warrior was disconsolate; but finally he summoned up courage and asked for particulars; how they had behaved, what they had done, and all about them. “Well,” replied Mrs. Tabayant, “they were always fighting. I couldn’t turn my back but what they would be pulling one another’s hair, clawing and biting and banging each other in the nose and eyes.” Antoine pricked up his ears. “Which one was the best man?” he asked blandly. Oh, Abraham Lincoln was always on top,” answered his wife. “He could throw Jefferson Davis down, blacken his eyes and make his nose bleed every time.” The soldier’s face lit up with a broad smile. “By golly, that’s purty gosh darn good!” he exclaimed. Jus’ like I tole them fellers down South, aroun’ Richmond-“You’ll never find a Jefferson Davis that can lick one of our Abraham Linkum’s.” Source: The Crooked Tree By John Couchois Wright Copyright 1917 Starting page 122
CHIBADICE A. 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] 1864. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Other Data Home: Michigan [...]
CHETEGO Thomas K. 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Mich. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
ANDRESS Edwin V. Captain 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] No Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of [...]
ANDREW John 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Michigan Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of [...]
AR-PE-TARGE-ZHIK Oliver 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Virginia Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of [...]
ASHMAN Daniel 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Georgia. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of [...]
BENNETT Louis 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] DC Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
ANDERSON Peter 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] No Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of [...]
BAILLY GRAVERAET Sophia 1800-1891 - 3%
[...] customs, legends, and traditions, and was noted for her gift as a story-teller. She met and entertained General, afterward President, Zachary Taylor, while on the Mississippi. She was personally acquainted with James J. Strong, the Mormon leader, who visited her school and told her to never fear the Mormons as he would see that none of them ever did her any harm. She knew Schoolcraft, the historian; Beaumont, the famous surgeon, and many other noted people. By all she was welcomed as an exceedingly interesting and well-informed woman, and a great friend of the American Indian, whom she helped to [...]
DUTTON Luther 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Michigan Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
DRIGGS William Jefferson 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Michigan Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Driggs, William Jefferson. N [...]
1855 Little Traverse Plea For Education - 3%
Nov. 22, 1855 General Council Convened at Little Travers, Michigan Hon. Marrypenney Superintendent of Indian Affairs. Sir, We the Ottawa and Chippewa nation of Indians, who in time past have striven with earnestness to attain the arts and civilization, Christianizing like people, and hope for the future prosperity of our children, our brethren and all! Would respectfully represent, that our Great Father the Government of the U.S. would set apart a fund for the purpose of educating some of our Indian youth among the whites, whom we may see fit to educate, and that they may be fitted for [...]
E-TAR-IVEGEZHIK John 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] 1864 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
GIBSON Joseph 1st Michigan SS Co. K - 3%
[...] 7714 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
GEORGE David 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Virginia Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings of [...]
1855 Questions Regarding Land Choices - 3%
[...] Indian Missionary at Middleville, Barry Co. Michigan. Very Respectfully Your Obt. Serts. Louis Genereaux Sha qua nah, his x mark A squa oo say, his x mark Joseph Elliott Shawgahwohbahno, his x mark Mido oo may, his x mark Shaw book migh, his x mark Note ne skung, his x mark Ahskebahgosh, his x mark Wah be zees, his x mark Ma ske yah she, his x mark Ka she way, his x mark To: George Marypenny Comm. of Indian Affairs Washington City, D. C. Mackinac Agency Letters Received by [...]
COLLINS William 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] 1863 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
1st Michigan Sharpshooters Co. K - ROSTER - 3%
[...] Private Pentwater Oceana ETARWEGESHIG ETAWEGEZHIK ETAWEGISHIEK ETAWIGAZHIK ETORAWORGOSHIG GENEREAU Louis Private Pentwater Oceana GENERCEN GENEREAUX GEORGE David Private Isabella Isabella GIBSON Joseph Private Bear [...]
COLLINS Jacob 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] given. Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
1st Michigan Sharpshooters Company K - Red Book - 3%
[...] 1864, the sharp-shooters belonged to Colonel Christ's 2d brigade, of the 2d division, commanded by General O. B. Wilcox, and commenced their first important engagements with the enemy in the memorable battles of the Wilderness, sustaining a loss of twenty-five in killed, wounded, and missing. On these occasions they performed commendable service for a new and inexperienced regiment, and in the second day's battle bore an active and distinguished part with their veteran associates; and soon following these battles came that of Spottsylvania, in which it became signally celebrated. On May 9th the 9th corps moved forward in the direction of Spottsylvania, the 3d division in the advance, and before noon encountered the enemy, when the lines were formed, the sharp-shooters, in command of Colonel C. V. De Land, on the left. Immediately the division experienced severe fighting; for a time the line wavered, but advanced quickly, gaining ground all day, and on the 10th, with the corps, crossed the Po river, and went into position on the heights southwest of the river, where its artillery commanded the junction of the two great wagon roads which the rebels had to hold in order to cover Richmond. Heavy skirmishing continued on the 11th, and the height of the fighting was reached on the next day, said to have been acknowledged by the Generals of both armies as one of the bloodiest of the campaign. The rain having continued for two days, the roads had become totally impassable, and it was only by the most persistent and overtasking exertions that the 9th and 2d corps were joined and put in a defensive position. The rebel General, moving on plank and macadamized roads, took quick advantage of this state of affairs to make a tremendous onslaught upon the 9th corps while thus isolated and unsupported, with a swollen and almost impassable river in its rear. General Burnside, not waiting to be attacked, initiated the action, and the fighting commenced at 4 o'clock A. M,, the 1st division (Crittenden's) in front, assisted by the 2d division (Potter's) maintained the action until noon, when the 3d division (Wilcox's) was put in, when a most determined and vigorous attack was made by the 1st brigade, under General Hartranft, which drove the rebels into their works and gave the Union troops a most decided advantage, and the division was instantly formed and ordered to assault the main line of works, while, at the same time, as was afterwards ascertained, Anderson's corps of the rebel army had been preparing to charge to dislodge the Union troops. The Federal line swiftly advanced, with a cheer, to the desperate contest. Answering back came the shrill yell of the rebel hosts, as if in confident defiance. Midway the space between the two lines of battle the two charging columns met, amid the thick smoke of battle, in a dense thicket of pines; the bloody struggle commenced, and almost in an instant after the first shock they became mixed in inextricable confusion, and the charge became a series of furious and unrelenting hand-to-hand encounters. At length the superior numbers of the rebels began to force the Union lines to retire; regiment after regiment fell slowly and sullenly back, and the whole left was in retreat. The terrible sacrifice of the troops attest their valor and the magnitude of the struggle. On a little knoll, among the thick spindling pine, where their rifles commanded the country for their full range rallied two Michigan regiments— the 1st sharp-shooters, Colonel De Land, and the 27th, Major Moody, while a little back, in a ravine, was the 14th New York battery, supported by the 2d Michigan infantry. The combat, slowly, sullenly, disastrously rolling down from the left, was bursting upon them, when Colonel Humphrey, of the 2d Michigan, commanding brigade, cool as an iceberg and resolute as fate, said : "Boys, this must be stopped." The leaden hail pattered and whistled with terrific furor, but the little band stood firm. More than once the bold rebels laid their hands on the guns of the battery only to be driven back by well-directed volleys. A cheer arose, the rebels were checked, broken, but not defeated; in incredible short time they had reformed, and again the fearful struggle was renewed. On the right stood the 27th, fighting with unequalled coolness and bravery; everything on the left of the sharp-shooters had been swept away, and the attack on their front and flank, with both infantry and artillery pouring in shot and shell, was terrific; but they gallantly held their ground. On the left of the sharpshooters were a company of civilized Indians, in command of the gallant and lamented young Graveraet, an educated half-breed—as brave a band of warriors as ever struck a war-path; they suffered dreadfully, but never faltered nor moved, sounding the war-whoop with every volley, and their unerring aim quickly taught the rebels they were standing on dangerous ground. The fighting continued on. Near night a rumor runs along the lines that ammunition is gone, and the cry of give them the steel is received with a cheer. The attack has again been repulsed, and the storm lulls; the fight is losing its horrid fury, and with a fearful burst of artillery it sinks into a scattered skirmish, but not until the darkness came did the battle cease. During this fearful and bloody day Col. De Land was twice struck and prostrated by the flying missiles, but badly injured as he was remained faithful to his command. The regiment lost 34 killed, 117 wounded, and 4 missing. Among the killed was Major John Piper, a brave and lamented officer, who, after several years of hard and faithful service, fell by a shot through the brain. Passing through Grant's great campaign on Richmond with much credit and crossing the James river, it arrived with its division in front of Petersburg June 16, 1864, and on the next day, while in command of Major Levant C. Rhines, became so heavily engaged and so specially distinguished in charging and holding the enemy's works and repelling his repeated assaults to retake them that this bloody battle becomes one of the most prominent events in the history of the regiment. The position of the regiment being on the extreme left of the corps, and the 5th corps failing to connect the line after the capture of the rebel works, a large gap was left through which the rebels poured their troops, and most severe fighting occurred, the regiment most gallantly repulsing the enemy in two successive and vigorous charges, taking two officers and eighty-six men prisoners, and the colors of the 35th North Carolina, which were captured by Corporal Benj. F. Young, of company I, who was promoted for distinguished gallantry on the occasion. During the engagement the left of the regiment became completely enveloped, and was placed in a position compelling it either to surrender or cut its way through the rebel lines; the last-named resort was determined on, and having first destroyed the national color of the regiment to prevent its falling into the hands of the enemy, then commenced fighting its way out, and finally succeeded in getting through the rebel lines. The gallant Major Rhines fell in this desperate struggle, together with 31 killed and died of wounds, 46 wounded, and 84 missing. Lieut. Garrett A. Graveraet died at Washington, D. C., July 10, 1864, of wounds received in action before Petersburg June 17, 1864. Capt. George C. Knight and Lieut. Martin Wrager killed before Petersburg; the former in action June 17th, and the latter in the trenches June 23d, 1864. On the 30th of July the regiment led its brigade in the charge on the rebel works contiguous to the fort which was blown up by the "mine," and aided in carrying the works, taking about fifty prisoners. The rebels having finally succeeded in retaking the works it was obliged to retire, with a loss of three killed, twelve wounded, and thirty-three missing. The regiment remained in front of Petersburg until the 19th of August, when it was ordered to move to the Weldon railroad. Soon after its arrival it assisted in retaking a line of works from which our forces had been driven. Its loss in this affair was one killed and two wounded. Until the 28th of September the regiment was here engaged in the erection of fortifications. On the 30th of September it participated in the battle near Peebles' House, with a loss of three wounded and sixteen missing. The casualties of the regiment while in the trenches in front of Petersburg were twenty-seven killed and died of wounds and six wounded. On the 27th of October the regiment took part in the movement toward the South-Side Railroad, and was engaged during the day in skirmishing with the enemy, losing five men wounded. On April 2d, 1865, the regiment, while in command of Lieut. Col. W. A. Nichols and in the brigade of Col. Ralph Ely, again most signally acquired a very enviable notoriety and great credit for a most daring and brilliant achievement while making a demonstration in front of Petersburg, on the left of the enemy's works, for the purpose of drawing troops from his right while our forces were attacking him at other points. After making two efforts, under a very severe fire of musketry and artillery, the regiment succeeded in getting hold on his works to the extent of its regimental front, which it held for an hour under a terrific fire. The object of the attack having been attained it was ordered back to its former position, having suffered a heavy loss. On the next day, about 4 A. M., it was again ordered to advance, under the supposition that the enemy was withdrawing. On moving forward and finding that he had evacuated his works, it pushed on and was the first regiment to enter Petersburg, and, while Col. Ely was receiving the surrender of the city, raised the first national flag on the courthouse of that rebel stronghold. The capture of Petersburg was long and anxiously looked for, as leading to the immediate possession of Richmond by the Union forces. It was finally accomplished, the rebel army fled, and Richmond fell. Michigan troops were prominently instrumental in bringing about the result. Colonel Ely's brigade of Michigan regiments, belonging to Wilcox's division, (1st,) 9th corps, were, as previously stated, the first to enter the city and place their colors on the public buildings, raising one flag on the court-house and another on the custom-house; Colonel Ely himself receiving the surrender of the city from the authorities. Gen. Wilcox, in the following report of the operations of his division in that affair, says: "I have the honor to report the operations of this division in the field from the 29th of March to the 9th of April, 1865, inclusive. "On the night of the 29th of March, at half-past 10 o'clock, the enemy opened on my lines, stretching from above Fort Morton to the Appomattox, with all their artillery of every description and some musketry from their main line. At about 11 o'clock the artillery lulled. I expected an advance of the enemy's troops and was ready to receive them, but no attack was made, and a desultory firing of artillery only continued through the night. "It afterwards appeared from the official reports of the enemy that they thought that we had made an attack; in fact, Major-General Gordon reported such to be the case, and that they had handsomely repulsed us; but although we were under orders from corps headquarters to be ready to attack, and I had caused to be distributed axes for cutting the enemy's abatis, yet no sort of attack was actually ordered or made on our front. "The sensitiveness of the enemy seemed to encourage our men. Preparations were made on the 31st as well as on April 1st for a night attack opposite Forts Steadman and Haskell, 3d brigade, and at a point in front of Ely's brigade, nearer the Appomattox. Through the night of the 2d various demonstrations were made along the line, and the enemy's picket-pits captured at various points, in pursuance of orders from corps headquarters, made in aid of operations being carried on, on the left of the army. "At about 1 o'clock, on the morning of the 2d April, orders were received from corps headquarters to mass one brigade (except garrisons) by 4 o'clock on the same morning near Fort Sedgwick, on the 2d division front, where Gen. Hartranft was to make a real attack with his division and a brigade from each of the other divisions, while, by the same order, I was directed to make a vigorous demonstration along my whole division line with the rest of my troops at the same hour. "Col. Harrirnan was accordingly detached, with staff officers who knew the road, tools, ammunition, and every possible aid, to report to Hartranft; and this brigade was in position and formed at the moment required. "The demonstration along the line began precisely at 4 by the 2d brigade, Brevet Col. Ralph Ely; 3d brigade, Brevet Col. G. P. Robinson, and Col. Wm. J. Bolton, commanding 51st Pennsylvania, left on the 1st brigade line of entrenchments. Some of the enemy's picket-pits were captured near the " Old Crater" by Col. Bolton. The pickets of the 3d and 2d brigades, strongly reinforced, advanced handsomely, the artillery opened vigorously, and large portions of the enemy were down to oppose what they considered a real attack in force. "On the extreme right, near the Appomattox, a portion of Ely's brigade actually carried some two hundred yards of the enemy's works; but our lines, two miles in length, were too much attenuated to hold the ground. Some seventy-five prisoners were secured and brought in. Three regiments were withdrawn from other points and double-quicked to the point, but before it could be reinforced the enemy had recovered it. "The effect of the movement, however, on the grand result was most happy, inasmuch as it contributed to weaken the enemy's line in front of Fort Sedgwick, where the real attack was completely successful. "For the handsome part performed by Harriman's brigade of this division at the latter point I respectfully refer you to his own report and that of Brevet Major-Gen. Hartranft, commanding at that part of the line. "Through the day offensive demonstrations were kept up, and the batteries playing in aid of the more serious work of the day going on further to the left. “In the afternoon and evening the enemy strengthened their line opposite me; but about midnight of the 2d reports came up from Colonel Ely, commanding 2d brigade, and Col. James Bentliff, now commanding 3d brigade, by virtue of his rank, that there were signs of the enemy’s withdrawing from our front, leaving only their picket line. I gave orders to the 2d brigade commanders to press through as soon as possible. "At about 2 A. M. on the 3d some of our parties broke through. "Bentliff's brigade advanced upon Cemetery Hill and Ely's more directly into town, with a section of Stone's battery. I gave Col. Ely orders to take measures to at once secure order in the city. "At 4.28 one of Ely's flags, that of the 1st Michigan sharp-shooters, was raised on the court-house, and that of the 2d Michigan on the custom-house a few minutes later, and guards were posted about the town." The 2d and 20th Michigan infantry and 1st Michigan sharp-shooters were in the 2d brigade, commanded by Col. Ralph Ely, of the 8th Michigan. The 8th and 27th Michigan were in the 1st brigade. The 17th Michigan were acting as an engineer regiment at division headquarters.
DAVID John 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] Maryland Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
DABASEQUAM Jonah 1st MI SS Co. K - 3%
[...] 1864 Source: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in The Civil War 1861-1865 Michigan Adjutant General Dept. Call No. E514.3 M62 V. 44 First Michigan Sharpshooters Edit Alternate spellings [...]
1855 Plea for Information by Ottawa and Chippewa - 3%
[...] desire of the government to make some conventional arrangements and adjustments in reference to their general business, they would be glad to be informed, if consistant, at what time it is proposed to transact the same. We further desire a statement of our rights, and of the amt. of money due us under the old Treaties made with our ancestors. Delegates from the Ottawas Grand River Na bun e ge zich, his x mark Ne ben e zec, [...]
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